Wednesday, September 28, 2011

How The Relationship Between Man And Animal Changed After The Flood (Part 1) - Genesis 9:1-3 Bible Commentary


This is the first part in a two part series on Genesis 9:1-3.

The opening verses of Genesis 9 are best understood when compared to the events that occurred on the sixth day of history. By the sixth day, God had already created the sun, moon, stars, plants, fish, and animals. All that was left to do was create man.

God created man in His image (Genesis 1:26). He made them male and female. The very first recorded words that God spoke to the first two human beings were:
Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth, and subdue it; and rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over every living thing that moves on the earth. (Genesis 1:28)
Adam and Eve were assigned the task of growing the human race from two people. They were also commanded to rule over God's creation. This ruling was not to be done with a destructive iron rod; they were not to rule as viscous tyrants. Instead, they were to rule with nobility as the those who bore the image of God, living in harmony with the animals.

Although man was much different from the animals (in that he was made in God's image), man also shared some things in common with the animals. The food which man was given to eat was the same food that the animals were given to eat: every plant yielding seed (Genesis 1:29), every tree which has fruit yielding seed (Genesis 1:29), every green plant for food (Genesis 1:30). This diet, however, would not be permanent.

Fast forward over 2000 years of human history and it becomes quite obvious that Adam and Eve did not have any trouble obeying the command to be fruitful. After over 2000 years of human history, there were a grand total of eight people living on the earth!

Next >>

Related Posts:
How Man's Diet Changed After The Flood - Genesis 9:3-4
Summary of Genesis 8
Did Noah Gather "Vegetarian" Food? - Genesis 6:21
The Cave Men of Genesis - Genesis 4
The Cycle Of The Seasons - Genesis 8:22

Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Quote of the Day #168 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall on joy that endures:
How we would ridicule the man who, when the sun shines in at his window, tries to trap the sunbeams indoors by closing the shutters. But we are just as foolish to take our present joy, then turn away from God's presence, supposing that we have all we need. You can feel the heat from the sun only when you stand beneath its rays; you can feel God's comfort only as you keep your face turned toward Him.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

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Quote of the Day #169 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #165 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #166 - J. C. Ryle
Quote of the Day #167 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Sunday, September 25, 2011

Quote of the Day #167 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon on how sin damages the conscience:
Sin is a disease which, in some cases causes extreme pain and anguish, but in other instances deadens sensibility. It frequently happens that, the more sinful a man is, the less he is conscious of it. It was remarked of a certain notorious criminal that many thought him innocent because, when he was charged with murder, he did not betray the least emotion. In that wretched self-possession there was to my mind presumptive proof of his great familiarity with crime: if an innocent person is charged with a great offence, the mere charge horrifies him. It is only by weighing all the circumstances, and distinguishing between sin and shame, that he recovers himself. He who can do the deed of shame does not blush when he is charged with it.
~Charles Spurgeon (Healing By The Stripes Of Jesus 2000.711)

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Quote of the Day #168 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #164 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #165 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #166 - J. C. Ryle
Quote Index

Saturday, September 24, 2011

The Earth Belongs To God - Psalm 24:1-2 Bible Commentary


What picture do you get in your mind when you hear the word "world"?

If you are like most people, you see a blue and green sphere, and behind this sphere is likely a black background (which might be filled with stars).

Not too long ago, people formed a very different picture in their minds. Why? Because that picture of a globe hanging on nothing had never been seen. It was not until the space age that man saw, for the first time, what the earth looked like from a distance.

In these days, images of the earth from a distance are everywhere. Typically, they are the focal point of advertisements promoting that we should take care of "Mother Earth"— that humans, because we are at the top of the evolutionary ladder, have the responsibility to manage what we control— that which we own: the earth. In the midst of all this absurdity, the world needs to hear this:
The earth is the LORD’S, and all it contains,
The world, and those who dwell in it. (Psalm 24:1)
Humans do have the responsibility to manage the earth. But the reason for this responsibility is not because we are highly evolved or because we are the owners of the earth. The reason we must manage the earth is because we are commanded to by the One who does own the earth.

Not a man on this planet truly owns a piece of property. The Lord is the owner of the earth. Psalm 24:1 clearly states: The earth is the LORD's and all it contains.

But why is the earth the Lord's? Why does it belong to Him? Psalm 24:2 provides an answer:
For He has founded it upon the seas
And established it upon the rivers. (Psalm 24:2)
The earth belongs to the Lord because He created it! When a man creates a song, he attaches his name to it. That song is his song— it belongs to him— he is the composer. In a similar way, the Lord is the composer of the earth and all that it contains.

Ultimately, God is the Creator of all things. The world would do well to throw aside their petty naturalistic dogmas and worship the Creator. The world would do well to abandon the foolish notion that they own the earth, and to recognize Him who owns everything!

Related Posts:
Traverse Not With Wickedness - Psalm 1:1
Earthly Weapons - Psalm 21:7
Do Not Fret Because of Evildoers - Psalm 37:1-2

Friday, September 23, 2011

Quote of the Day #166 - J. C. Ryle


A quote from J. C. Ryle:
Only the Holy Spirit can give edge to sermons, and point to advice, and power to rebukes, and cast down the high walls of sinful hearts. It is not better preaching and finer writing that is wanted in this day, but more of the presence of the Holy Spirit.
~J. C. Ryle (Alive Or Dead?)

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Quote of the Day #167 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #163 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #164 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #165 - William Gurnall
Quote Index

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Summary of Genesis 8


For 150 days, God made His wrath known through a global flood. But in the midst of all the earth-ravishing waves, God had not forgotten Noah (Genesis 8:1). At the end of the first 150 days of the flood, God did something: He sent a wind upon the earth that caused the water to begin receding. The recession of the waters was a multi-month process, of which Genesis 8 provides many details.

The timeline below includes all the dates in Genesis 8 in chronological order:
Chronology of the Flood Genesis Timeline Graphic

(To view a larger version of this graphic click here).

Two of the most famous events in Genesis 8 are these: Noah sending out the raven, and Noah sending out the dove. Many have sought to find hidden symbols in these two events, but the best conclusion is this: Noah sent out an unsymbolical raven and an unsymbolical dove.

After Noah brought his bird-sending ventures to an end, New Year's Day was quickly approaching. On that special day, Noah removed the covering of the ark and looked out: the earth was dry, but not completely dry. And so, Noah waited some more. For almost three more months Noah waited until the day came that God spoke and commanded him to leave the ark.

Noah left the ark on the 27th day of the 2nd month (Genesis 8:14). The era of the post-flood world had begun, and Noah marked the occasion by offering up a burnt offering to the Lord. The offering Noah offered was not given out of obligation, but from a pure motive: his love for God.

The aroma of Noah's burnt offering drifted up to the heavens, and God found its aroma pleasing. It is at this point in time that Scripture states what God said in His heart:
The LORD smelled the soothing aroma; and the LORD said to Himself, “I will never again curse the ground on account of man, for the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth; and I will never again destroy every living thing, as I have done. (Genesis 8:21)
God decided that He would not add to the Genesis 3 curse on the ground (but neither did He lift it). Despite man's sinfulness from youth, God chose to show mercy to the post-flood world. Never again would God send a flood to destroy the whole earth. For as long as the earth remained, the cycle of the seasons would never again be globally interrupted (Genesis 8:22).

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Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Quote of the Day #165 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall:
Do not think you are the source of your own comfort. Remember that you depend on God for your continued peace and joy. The smiles you had yesterday will not make you happy today, any more than the bread you ate then will keep you satisfied if you do not eat again. You will need new draughts of God's love every day to keep you satisfied. Let God hide His face just for a moment, and you will quickly forget the taste and lose sight of the comforts you had just a short time earlier.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

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Quote of the Day #166 - J. C. Ryle
Quote of the Day #162 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #163 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #164 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Sunday, September 18, 2011

Quote of the Day #164 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon on the cross:
The cross is the focus of all human history—I was almost going to say it is the center of the life of God, if such a thing can be. All the ages meet in Calvary. Jesus is the central Sun of all events.

O, gaze again, and marvel more and more that God should put Himself into the place of His offending creature, and in the Person of His dear Son should offer to eternal justice a compensation for the insults which sin had cast upon law and rule! There is no greatness in Heaven or earth if it is not here in the bleeding flesh of Jesus, the Son of God! All else is dwarfed into nothingness in His Presence
~Charles Spurgeon (The Great Mystery Of Godliness 786.700)

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Quote of the Day #161 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #162 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #163 - John Owen
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Saturday, September 17, 2011

A Hope Made Only Of Sand - The Gospel (Part 6 of ∞)


Hope. The word carries an inherent sense of calmness. Hope is the opposite of destitution and emptiness. When hope is gone, all is lost. When hope is present, all is found.

Many people persistently pursue a false hope— a hope which is temporal, a hope which quickly fades away. This false hope sounds its trumpet loud and clear. It urges people to hope in their accomplishments. It urges people to increase in pride rather than humility.

True wisdom sounds its battle cry with a much different tune, “Do not think yourself to be wiser than you actually are! Do not hope in yourself, for you are a mortal creature! Instead, hope in that which is greater than yourself. Hope in that which endures!"

The world is filled with hopelessness. Earthquakes rattle the planet. Tsunamis, Hurricanes, and Tornadoes bring chaos, sweeping up masses of human life. Poverty plagues much of the globe. Hopeless people are everywhere.

Every day, countless numbers of people think they have finally grasped hope, but the hope that they find is nothing but a handful of wet sand. The beach may have brought some pleasure, but as the days pass, the sand begins to dry. As the years pass, the dry sand, as in an hourglass, slowly falls from their grasp, so that when death finally approaches, they have nothing but empty hands. What will be the outcome for those with empty hands on that final day? What will be the outcome for those who refused to cling to things of eternal value? Nothing but the wrath of God. Nothing but judgment.

Oh what a privilege it is to be able to seek Christ now! To be able to seek Him while alive and with breath— because death will soon come. How awful it would be to fall into the hands of God without the blood of Christ!

<< Prev | Next >>

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The Gospel (7 of ∞)
The Gospel (5 of ∞)
The Gospel (4 of ∞)
The Gospel (3 of ∞)

Friday, September 16, 2011

Quote of the Day #163 - John Owen


A quote from John Owen:
Consider what ways, what companies, what opportunities, what studies, what businesses, what conditions, have at any time given, or do usually give, advantages to your distempers, and set yourself heedfully against them all. Men will do this with respect unto their bodily infirmities and distempers. The seasons, the diet, the air that have proved offensive shall be avoided. Are the things of the soul of less importance?

Know that he that dares to dally with occasions of sin will dare to sin. He that will venture upon temptations unto wickedness will venture upon wickedness.

~John Owen (Of The Mortification Of Sin In Believers, Part 2, Chapter 11)

This quote was taken from the book Overcoming Sin and Temptation, Three Classic Works By John Owen, published by Crossway in 2006.

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Quote of the Day #162 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #159 - William Gurnall
Quote Index

Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Quote of the Day #162 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall:
It is horrible pride for a beggar to starve rather than take alms from a rich man, or for a condemned criminal to choose death rather than accept pardon from the hand of a compassionate ruler. Yet here is something worse – for a soul pining and perishing in sin to reject the mercy of God and the helping hand of Christ to save him. God says there is not a soul He cannot save. If you continue in your self-effacing way, you call Him a liar. You have been tricked into believing your tears are a stronger purgative than Christ’s blood.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

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Quote of the Day #163 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #159 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #160 - J. C. Ryle
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Monday, September 12, 2011

Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 4) - 64 AD - Church History


This is the fourth part in a four part series, to go to part one click here.

The reason why human society can work in a fallen world filled with fallen men is this: the conscience. God, by His grace, has given every man a conscience. And although the conscience can be seared, the conscience restrains men from the evil that they desire to do. Tacitus demonstrates the restraining power of the conscience quite well:
Nero offered his gardens for the spectacle [the executions], and was exhibiting a show in the circus, while he mingled with the people in the dress of a charioteer or stood aloft on a car. Hence, even for criminals who deserved extreme and exemplary punishment, there arose a feeling of compassion; for it was not, as it seemed, for the public good, but to glut one man's cruelty, that they were being destroyed. (source)
During Nero's reign, the human conscience was certainly active, and there came a point when even the unbelieving world began to grow tired of seeing such tortures inflicted upon the Christians.

The persecutions under Nero were not the first persecutions of Christians in history. From the very beginning in Jerusalem (starting with Stephan), Christians had been persecuted, even put to death. What made Nero's persecutions significant is that they demonstrated just how far Christianity had spread within the first 30 years. From the very beginning, Christians were willing, through the power of the Spirit, to literally pick up their crosses and die (a fact clearly supported by Tacitus' ancient writings).

The persecution in Rome under Nero provides a graphic illustration of the cost of following Jesus Christ. We should not forget the words of the Apostle Paul: If we have hoped in Christ in this life only, we are of all men most to be pitied. (1 Corinthians 15:19)

This world is not supposed to be our home. And those early Christians, who lived and died during the reign of Nero, certainly provide a vivid reminder to this us of what it means to follow Christ.

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For a historical fiction post on what the great fire in Rome might have looked like from the perspective of a Christian slave in Rome, click here.

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Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28 - 2948 BC (Pre-Flood History)
The Flood - Genesis 7:11 - 2349 BC (Pre-Flood History)
Slavery, The Great Fire In Rome, and Nero

Saturday, September 10, 2011

Quote of the Day #161 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
Of all dust the worst for the eyes is gold dust. A bribe blinds the judgment, and riches darken the mind.
~Charles Spurgeon (Plain Talk For Plain People PP61)

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Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #159 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #160 - J. C. Ryle
Quote Index

Friday, September 09, 2011

Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 3) - 64 AD - Church History


This is the third part in a four part series, to go to part one click here.

Tacitus continues with a discussion of the the great persecution of Christianity that broke out:
Accordingly [going back to the subject of the fire], an arrest was first made of all who pleaded guilty; then, upon their information, an immense multitude was convicted, not so much of the crime of firing the city, as of hatred against mankind. (source)
The last part is particularly interesting: the Christians were convicted "not so much of the crime of firing the city, as of hatred against mankind."

Paul wrote in his first letter to the Corinthians:
For the word of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God. (1 Corinthians 1:18)
The message of the gospel is absurd to the unbeliever, and in fact, the message of the cross is seen as hatred against mankind. To a world in love with itself, anything that disrupts the daily prideful rhythm of life is seen as repulsive.

Tacitus continues with a graphic description of the persecutions heaped upon the Christians:
Mockery of every sort was added to their deaths. Covered with the skins of beasts, they were torn by dogs and perished, or were nailed to crosses, or were doomed to the flames and burnt, to serve as a nightly illumination, when daylight had expired. (source)
Jesus' command to "take up your cross" is not merely a play on words. As Christians, we are called to physically give up our bodies when necessary. The Christians in the first century obeyed Jesus' command: They picked up their crosses and were executed for their faith— some of those early believers even had to endure being burned alive, used as human candlesticks.

<< Prev | Next >>

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Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 4) - 64 AD - Church History
Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28 - 2948 BC (Pre-Flood History)
The Flood - Genesis 7:11 - 2349 BC (Pre-Flood History)
Slavery, The Great Fire In Rome, and Nero

Thursday, September 08, 2011

Quote of the Day #160 - J. C. Ryle


A quote from J. C. Ryle on regeneration:
Once more then, I say, I never despair of any man's soul being made alive. I should if it depended on man himself. Some seem so hardened, I should have no hope. I should if it depended on the work of ministers. Alas! The very best of us are poor, weak creatures. But I cannot despair, when I remember that God the Spirit is the agent who conveys life to the soul, for I know and am persuaded that with Him nothing is impossible. I should not be surprised to hear, even in this life, that the hardest man I ever met, had become softened, and the proudest had taken his place at the feet of Jesus as a weaned child.
~J. C. Ryle (Alive Or Dead?)

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Quote of the Day #157 - Matthew Meade
Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #159 - William Gurnall
Quote Index

Wednesday, September 07, 2011

Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 2) - 64 AD - Church History


This is the second part in a four part series, to go to part one click here.

Tacitus continues with a brief, but important summary of the origins of Christianity:
Christus, from whom the name [of Christianity] had its origin, suffered the extreme penalty [crucifixion] during the reign of Tiberius at the hands of one of our procurators, Pontius Pilatus, and a most mischievous superstition, thus checked for the moment, again broke out not only in Judaea, the first source of the evil, but even in Rome, where all things hideous and shameful from every part of the world find their centre and become popular. (source)
In this summary of Christianity, Tacitus places Jesus Christ in history. Jesus Christ was a real human being, ordered to be executed on the cross by a real man named Pontius Pilate. This is significant because Tacitus (living in the late first century and early second century) is in agreement with what is recorded in the inspired Scriptures: that Jesus was handed over to be executed by Pontius Pilate.

Just a quick side note: As Christians, our mindset should not be that Tacitus' writings confirm the general accuracy of the New Testament. Instead, as Christians, our mindset should be this: The New Testament confirms the general accuracy of Tacitus' writings on the subject of Christianity.

As Christians, we do not believe that the Bible is the inspired word of God merely because we can rattle off a list of historical reasons. Instead, as Christians, we believe that the Bible is the word of God because God has changed our hearts. He has made us new creatures in Christ Jesus— new creatures that believe what His written word says. Why? Because it is from Him!

It is not inherently wrong to have a list of historical reasons for believing the Bible is the word of God. Just know that such historical knowledge is useless if it is not built upon a firm foundation of faith in God.

<< Prev | Next >>

Related Posts:
Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 3) - 64 AD - Church History
Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28 - 2948 BC (Pre-Flood History)
The Flood - Genesis 7:11 - 2349 BC (Pre-Flood History)
Slavery, The Great Fire In Rome, and Nero

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

Quote of the Day #159 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall on the new covenant:
At bottom, pride in your own abilities is what keeps you working for righteousness. You keep trying to pray harder, working to be a better Christian, laboring to have more faith. You keep telling yourself, "I can do it!" But you will soon find your own grace insufficient for even the smallest task, and your joy will run out at the crannies of your imperfect duties and weak graces. The language of pride hankers after the covenant of works. The only way out of this trap is to let the new covenant cut the cord of the old one, and acknowledge that the grace of Christ supersedes the works of the law.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

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Quote of the Day #156 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #157 - Matthew Meade
Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, September 05, 2011

Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 1) - 64 AD (Church History)


This is the first part in a four part series.

The year was 64 AD, and a great fire was sweeping through the streets of Rome. The fire burned for days, destroying a large portion of the city. Not only did it cut a path of ash through the city, but it also ignited a major persecution of Christianity.

It had been just over 30 years since the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. During those years, Christianity had expanded quickly, reaching cities far beyond Jerusalem. In fact, Christianity had reached the very heart of the Roman Empire: Rome itself.

The Apostle Paul wrote the book of Romans to... you guessed it: the church in Rome. The common Christian belief is that Paul wrote Romans somewhere between 56 AD to 60 AD. This means that the book of Romans was written shortly before the great fire in Rome of 64 AD.

Perhaps many Christians in Rome were familiar with the book of Romans when the fire swept through the city on that dark, and yet blazing July 19th night. This, however, is not the only reasons why the great fire is an important event in church history. The fire also marked the beginning of a major persecution of Christianity. In this persecution, some think that the Apostle Peter and the Apostle Paul were martyred (although some believe that Paul lived past 64 AD, reaching Spain, where he continued spreading the gospel).

Tacitus (an ancient, secular historian, born in 56 AD) wrote the following about the great fire in Rome (I have added additional commentary in brackets for clarity's sake):
“Consequently, to get rid of the report [that Nero started the fire], Nero fastened the guilt and inflicted the most exquisite tortures on a class hated for their abominations, called Christians by the populace. (source)
If you are unfamiliar with Roman History, you are probably wondering: Who is this Nero guy?

Here is a brief synopsis: Nero was the fifth emperor of the Roman Empire. Nero was so hated among many in Rome that some thought that he was the one who had started the destructive fire. In order to "get rid of the report" that he started the fire, he had to find someone to blame. And who did he decide the blame? The Christians.

Next >>

Related Posts:
Nero Blames Great Roman Fire On Christians (Part 2) - 64 AD - Church History
Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28 - 2948 BC (Pre-Flood History)
The Flood - Genesis 7:11 - 2349 BC (Pre-Flood History)
Slavery, The Great Fire In Rome, and Nero

Saturday, September 03, 2011

Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
You can never kill the Church till you can kill Christ— and you can never defeat her till you defeat the Lord Jesus who already wears the crown of triumph! The grand old cause is safe! The outlook may be dark, just now, and it may be unpopular to follow the Lamb wherever He goes, but the day will come when they who do so shall walk in white, for they are worthy! The wheel will turn and they that are lowest, now, shall soon be highest— they that have been with Him in the dust shall be with Him in His Glory.
~Charles Spurgeon (Our Ascended Lord 1928.611)

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Quote of the Day #155 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #156 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #157 - Matthew Meade
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Friday, September 02, 2011

The Cycle Of The Seasons (Part 2) - Genesis 8:22 Bible Commentary


This is the second part in a two part series, click here to go to part one.

God made the sun, moon, and stars in order to keep track of time:
Then God said, “Let there be lights in the expanse of the heavens to separate the day from the night, and let them be for signs and for seasons and for days and years; and let them be for lights in the expanse of the heavens to give light on the earth”; and it was so. (Genesis 1:14-15)
There has only been one extended period of time in all of history when it has been globally impossible to track the days with the sun, moon, and stars. When was that extended period of time? It was during the flood.

For forty days, rain fell, and water burst from the surface of the earth. It must have been a very dark planet in those days— literally. The thick clouds would have blocked out any light from coming in above. During those days, it would not have mattered where you were on the planet, because the conditions the same: water was everywhere— the normal seasonal schedule had been interrupted.

Chapter 8 of Genesis closes with God assuring the reader that while the earth remains the seasons will never again be interrupted:
While the earth remains,
Seedtime and harvest,
And cold and heat,
And summer and winter,
And day and night
Shall not cease.
(Genesis 8:22)
The day, however, is coming when the earth will no longer remain: it is called the day of judgment. And on that day, the seasons will once again be interrupted. Why? Because the earth will be destroyed! The old earth will be replaced with the new earth! In that new earth, Christ will be the source of light, not the sun (Revelation 21:23). How will seasons work in that new world? We can only wonder.

<< Prev

Related Posts:
How The Relationship Between Man And Animal Changed - Genesis 9:1-3
Summary of Genesis 8
Noah's Flood: The Historian's Best Friend - Genesis 8
A New Year, A New Era, A New World - Genesis 8:13
The Long Expected Rain - Genesis 7:10-12

Thursday, September 01, 2011

Quote of the Day #157 - Matthew Mead


A quote from Matthew Meade on the need to make your calling and election sure:
There are two questions of very great impor­tance which we should every one of us put to our­selves: “What am I?” and “Where am I?” Am I a child of God or not? Am I sincere in religion, or am I only a hypocrite under a profession? Am I yet in a natural state, or in a state of grace? Am I yet in the old root, in old Adam, or am I in the Root, Christ Jesus? Am I in the covenant of works that ministers only wrath and death, or am I in the covenant of grace that min­isters life and peace?

I press this upon you that are professors [those who call themselves Christians], because many rest in a notion of godli­ness and an outward show of religion, and yet remain in their natural condition.
~Matthew Meade (The Almost Christian)

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Quote of the Day #158 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #154 - J. C. Ryle
Quote of the Day #155 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #156 - William Gurnall
Quote Index