Wednesday, August 31, 2011

The Cycle Of The Seasons (Part 1) - Genesis 8:22 Bible Commentary


This is the first part in a two part series on Genesis 8:22

You are caught in a blinding whiteness. You extend your arm, but cannot see it. Like a mighty tornado, the snow whirls and whirls around you.

You hand thaws. Suddenly, a bolt of lighting shoots across the sky. As the thunder roars, your vision becomes clear. Rain patters down upon the earth, nourishing the blossoming trees.

Everything becomes green. At full force, the sun beams down its heat upon your back— but before you know it, everything begins to lose its green.

The trees turn red, orange, yellow— everything tumbles down, fades, and turns to brown— and once more, you feel the cold breeze return.

The cycle of the seasons is part of the human experience. While location does have an effect on the intensity and variation of the seasons, the basic experience is the same: as time ticks, seasons change. As years pass, seasons repeat. And all of it is a gracious reminder that time cannot be stopped, that man is mortal.

Next >>

Related Posts:
The Cycle Of The Seasons (Part 2) - Genesis 8:22
Noah's Flood: The Historian's Best Friend - Genesis 8
A New Year, A New Era, A New World - Genesis 8:13
The Long Expected Rain - Genesis 7:10-12
God Chooses To Be More Merciful To The Post-Flood World - Genesis 8:21

Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Quote of the Day #156 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall:
If you are one who holds yourself in high spiritual esteem, hear this: Many humble Christians, of low estate by the world’s standards, have much to offer you if you are not too proud to receive spiritual food at their hands.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #157 - Matthew Meade
Quote of the Day #153 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #154 - J. C. Ryle
Quote of the Day #155 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Quote of the Day #155 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
Let us each recollect that as God has given every man a head on his shoulders, every man is bound to use his own head, and not his father's. God gave your father judgment. Well and good: he judged for himself. He has given you a judgment: judge for yourself too. Say, concerning all that you have received in your early childhood, "Well, I will not lightly part with this, for it may be sterling gold; but at the same time, I will not blindly hoard it, for it may be counterfeit coin. I will sit down to the study of the Sacred Book, and I will endeavour, as far as I can, to unprejudice myself. I will read the Bible, just as if I had never heard any preacher, or had never been taught by a parent; and I will there endeavour to find out what God saith, and what God saith, be it what it may, I will believe and espouse, hoping that by his grace I may also feel the power of it in my own soul.
~Charles Spurgeon (Search the Scriptures 172)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #156 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #152 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #153 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #154 - J. C. Ryle
Quote Index

Friday, August 26, 2011

F. A. Q. (Frequently Asked Questions)

If you have a question that is not answered below, please leave a comment and your question will be answered shortly. Feel free to ask any question about Priceless Eternity. If your question is appropriate, it will likely be added to the list.

What is the purpose of Priceless Eternity?

The purpose of Priceless Eternity is to seek biblical truth.
For more information, visit the About Page.

I am a new reader. Are there any posts you would recommend?

There is a short list of recommended posts on the About page. After you read through those, scroll through the Scripture Index and other indexes and read whatever looks interesting.

What Translation Of The Bible Does Priceless Eternity Use?

The primary translation used on Priceless Eternity is now the English Standard Version (ESV). On older posts, the New American Standard Bible (NASB) is used. If some other translation is used, it will typically be cited with the appropriate abbreviation.

Can I Sign Up To Get An Automated Email When New Content Is Added?

Yes! Look in the right sidebar and your should see the option to "Follow by Email". Simply type your email address into the textbox, press submit, and follow the given instructions.

Currently, this Q&A is relatively short. The list will expand as more questions are asked!

Thursday, August 25, 2011

Quote of the Day #154 - J. C. Ryle


A quote from J. C. Ryle on being born again:
I know well this is a hard saying. I know well the children of this world dislike to hear they must be born again. It pricks their consciences. It makes them feel they are further off from heaven than they are willing to allow. It seems like a narrow door which they have not yet stooped to enter, and they would fain make the door wider, or climb in some other way.

But I dare not give place by subjection in this matter. I will not foster a delusion, and tell people they only need repent a little, and stir up a gift they have within them, in order to become real Christians. I dare not use any other language than that of the Bible. And I say in the words which are written for our learning, we all need to be born again, we are all naturally dead, and must be made alive.
~J. C. Ryle (Alive Or Dead?)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #155 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #151 - John Piper
Quote of the Day #152 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #153 - William Gurnall
Quote Index

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

God Chooses To Be More Merciful To The Post-Flood World - Genesis 8:21 Bible Commentary


This post is an overview of Genesis 8:21. To read about the first portion of Genesis 8:21 in greater detail click here, for the second portion click here, and for the third portion click here.

The flood was over, Noah had left the ark, and the aroma of his offering drifted up into the heavens. It is at this point, by the inspiration of the Holy Spirit (and through Moses), that Genesis records what God said in His heart:
The LORD smelled the soothing aroma; and the LORD said to Himself, “I will never again curse the ground on account of man, for the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth; and I will never again destroy every living thing, as I have done. (Genesis 8:21)
The underlying theme in Genesis 8:21 is this: God demonstrating His mercy to man.

Man is fallen. He has a heart that desires evil from youth. Because of sin, man deserves nothing but the wrath of God. Man does not deserve God's mercy. Any mercy that man does receive is a gracious gift.

God shows different kinds of grace towards fallen men. To all men, God shows His "common grace". This "common grace" is described in Genesis 8:21. God gives to all men (without distinction) the promise that He will not add to the curse on the ground (Genesis 8:21).

Jesus also spoke of God's common grace towards fallen man:
He causes His sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. (Matthew 5:45)
Even though man is undeserving, God continues to uphold the ecosystem of the earth. Man does not deserve the sunlight and rain with which grow the crops that he does not deserve to eat.

God is the one who chose to be more merciful towards this current era that we live in: the post-flood world. It is God who chooses to restrain His wrath in this current era, choosing not to demonstrate His anger towards sin with another global flood (Genesis 9:11).

It must be noted that the common grace God gives to man cannot save a man. Only saving grace can save a man. It is only through God's saving grace— it is only through His special revelation— it is only through Him changing a man's heart from a heart of stone into a heart of flesh— it is only through the blood of Jesus Christ that a man can be restored to his Creator.

Related Posts

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

Quote of the Day #153 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall:
The humble man may have Satan at his right hand to oppose him, but the proud man will find himself in a worse fix. God Himself will be there to resist him. If you doubt it, read His Word: "[He] resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble" (James 4:6).
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #154 - J. C. Ryle
Quote of the Day #150 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #151 - John Piper
Quote of the Day #152 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Saturday, August 20, 2011

Quote of the Day #152 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
Let us seek after the highest degree of holiness. Let us not be satisfied with being nominal Christians! Let us aim at the greatest measure of godliness. Let us plunge into the stream of Grace, immersing ourselves wholly into the life of God.

How many professors [so-called Christians] appear to know nothing of the real force and energy of the Spirit of God in subduing sin and creating holiness! Theirs is a shallow life. Alas, how much they lose! They come under the obligations of the House of God, but they do not know the infinite privileges of that house. It is for the truly spiritual that God reserves the choicest of His dainties. Be half a Christian and you shall have enough religion to make you miserable—be wholly a Christian and your joy shall be full
~Charles Spurgeon (The Foundation And Its Seal — A Sermon For The Times 1854.443)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #153 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #149 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #150 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #151 - John Piper
Quote Index

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

What I Have Learned From One Year Of Blogging

On August 17th 2010, I posted a quote. It was not just any ordinary quote... it was the first quote: Quote of the Day #1 - Charles Spurgeon.

At the time, I did not know what I was getting myself into. And if you would have told me that one year later (on August 17th 2011) that there would be 150 quotes on this website (and verse-by-verse commentary on several chapters of the Bible), I probably would not have believed you.

The day that I posted the first quote is the date that I consider the "official" starting date for this blog. That was the date that I decided to commit to blogging (I did write a few posts before then, including one on November 28, 2009— which was followed by a mysterious five month gap without any posts!).

I wanted to mark this "official" starting date with a

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

Quote of the Day #150 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall on pride:
Consider the possibility that pride is the reason we do so little good for others with our gifts. When pride prevails, we pray, preach, comfort, or console to be thought good by others, rather than to do good to others.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #151 - John Piper
Quote of the Day #147 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #148 - Martin Luther
Quote of the Day #149 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, August 15, 2011

The Intent Of Man's Heart Is Evil From His Youth - Genesis 8:21 Bible Commentary


This post only discusses a portion of Genesis 8:21. For an explanation of how this portion relates to the rest of Genesis 8:21, click here. For an overview of Genesis 8:21 click here

Even from the beginning chapters of Genesis, the testimony of Scripture is this: man is not good. The problem with man is not that he that he occasionally makes mistakes.

The problem with man is that he is evil.

Adam was made in the image of God, but since the fall in the garden, all men have been born in the image of fallen Adam (Genesis 5:3). While it is true that men are born in the image of God (Genesis 9:6), that image in man has been tainted. In fact, Genesis 8:21 says that man, even as a child, has a heart which gravitates to evil:
for the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth (Genesis 8:21)
Notice that Genesis 8:21 goes right to the source of man's problem. Why is society corrupt? Why is history filled with so much evil and bloodshed? It all goes back to this: the intent of man's heart, his heart's inclination, his disposition— what man's heart tends towards is this: evil.

The world and Satan want us believe the opposite of Genesis 8:21. They want us to believe this: That overall, man is a good creature! That man is born with a good heart. That man is born innocent— and any inconsistency or corruption in man is merely the fault of society.

Such falsities contradict both Genesis 8:21 and the rest of Scripture. The Bible proclaims that all men are just as believers: by nature children of wrath (Ephesians 2:3). King David said in deep sorrow, "Behold, I was brought forth in iniquity, And in sin my mother conceived me." (Psalm 51:5)

The beauty of the cross is that through Christ, God changes the evil intention of man's heart. Through Christ, God takes a man's stony heart, a heart that wants evil, and He turns that heart into a heart of flesh— a heart that wants Him (Ezekiel 36:26).

Related Posts
The Cycle Of The Seasons (Part 1) - Genesis 8:22
The Lord Smelled The Soothing Aroma - Genesis 8:21
What Curse On The Ground Was God Talking About After The Flood? - Genesis 8:21
God Chooses To Be More Merciful To The Post-Flood World - Genesis 8:21
Noah Builds The First Post-Flood Altar - Genesis 8:20

Saturday, August 13, 2011

Quote of the Day #149 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon on election:
How shall those who are the subjects of divine election sufficiently adore the grace of God? They have no room for boasting, for sovereignty most effectually excludes it. The Lord's will alone is glorified, and the very notion of human merit is cast out to everlasting contempt. There is no more humbling doctrine in Scripture than that of election, none more promotive of gratitude, and, consequently, none more sanctifying. Believers should not be afraid of it, but adoringly rejoice in it.
~Charles Spurgeon (ME661)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #150 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #146 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #147 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #148 - Martin Luther
Quote Index

Friday, August 12, 2011

What Curse On The Ground Was God Talking About After The Flood? (Part 3) - Genesis 8:21 Bible Commentary


This is part three in a three part series; click here to go to part one.

The reasoning behind why God would never again curse the ground on account of man is this: for the intent of man's heart is evil from his youth. But is this really a good reason not to curse the earth again? Did not God send the flood upon the earth because of man's continual wickedness? Why then is man's wickedness given as the reason to not curse the earth again?

No matter how much more God cursed the earth, men would still be wicked from birth. And so, rather than increase the curse, He chose to show mercy to fallen man by leaving things unaltered. Rather than making the curse upon the ground even harsher, God chose to patiently endure fallen, hellbound men (Romans 9:22). But why? For what reason? For what end? In order that He might make known His mercy to those He chose before the foundation of the world (Ephesians 1:4, also see Romans 9:23).

The bottom line is this: God has the freedom to demonstrate His mercy whenever (and for whatever reason) He wants. God has created everything for its own purpose, even the wicked for the day of evil (Proverbs 16:4). It is by His mercy alone that any person is saved. It is by His mercy that the curse on the ground is not a billion times worse. It is by His mercy that any person escapes the flames of hell.

A new era began after the flood, and in that era, God began to reveal more and more of Himself to fallen man. He began to make covenants with man, something He did not do in the pre-flood world. Shortly after the flood, God made a covenant with Noah. Eventually, He made one with Abraham. He then spoke through Moses and David, and through the prophets: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Ezekiel... all of it leading up to the ultimate revelation: Jesus Christ, our Saviour of infinite worth— who bears the curse of the law for us!

<< Prev

Related Posts:
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born - Genesis 5:25
The Lord Smelled The Soothing Aroma - Genesis 8:21
The Fall: Merciful Curses - The Christian Worldview

Thursday, August 11, 2011

Quote of the Day #148 - Martin Luther


A quote from Martin Luther on the doctrine of justification:
If the article of justification is lost, all Christian doctrine is lost at the same time. And all the people in the world who do not hold to this justification are either Jews or Turks or papists or heretics; for there is no middle ground between these two righteousness: the active one of the Law and the passive one which comes from Christ. Therefore the man who strays from Christian righteousness must relapse into the active one, that is, since he has lost Christ, he must put his confidence in his own works.
~Martin Luther

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #149 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #145 - Melancthon W. Jacobus
Quote of the Day #146 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #147 - William Gurnall
Quote Index

Wednesday, August 10, 2011

What Curse On The Ground Was God Talking About After The Flood? (Part 2) - Genesis 8:21 Bible Commentary


This is part two in a three part series; click here to go to part one.

There are two different curses on the ground mentioned in Scripture prior to the flood. One of these curses was implemented when Cain murdered his own brother (Genesis 4:8). But this curse, since it was only applied to Cain (Genesis 4:11), cannot be the curse referred to in Genesis 8:21 (Genesis 8:21 refers to a general curse which impacted all of humanity).

The other curse mentioned prior to the flood was a curse that was applied to all of humanity. In Genesis 3, because of the very first sin in the garden, God said to Adam:
Cursed is the ground because of you;
In toil you will eat of it
All the days of your life.
Both thorns and thistles it shall grow for you;
And you will eat the plants of the field
(Genesis 3:17)
This must be the curse referred to in Genesis 8:21, when God said, "I will never again curse the ground on account of man". After the flood, God did not remove the curse on the ground, but neither did He add to it. Praise God for His mercy! Praise God that he did not add to the curse of the ground after the flood!

But at the same time: Praise God that He did not take away the curse on the ground (see Merciful Curses). Even modern man, with technology that previous generations could only have dreamed of, cannot completely eliminate the curse on the ground. And so, even today, man continues hoping that someone will bring lasting rest from the curse on the ground. In some ways, this hope is similar (if not identical) to Lamech's hope many millennia ago:
This one will give us rest from our work and from the toil of our hands arising from the ground which the LORD has cursed. (Genesis 5:29)
How often does modern man echo out the same yearning cry as Lamech? Unfortunately, many ignore the ultimate reason for why the earth is still cursed: to remind man that he lives on a fallen planet.

Lamech's desire for rest from the curse on the ground, in some sense, was fulfilled through Noah. Starting with Noah, the length of human life began declining. Such a dramatic drop in life expectancy shortened the amount of time men would have to toil on the cursed ground. The steady improvements in technology since Noah have also made the curse on the ground less noticeable. But most importantly, it was through Noah that Christ came— who gives eternal rest to those who suffer in faith for a few years on this cursed planet.

<< Prev | Next >>

Related Posts:
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born - Genesis 5:25
The Lord Smelled The Soothing Aroma - Genesis 8:21
The Fall: Merciful Curses - The Christian Worldview

Tuesday, August 09, 2011

Quote of the Day #147 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall:
How would you feel, as an earthly parent, to see floodwaters rushing into your home, and have your trapped child refuse to let you carry him to safety? That must be how our heavenly Father feels when the floods of temptation threaten to overwhelm us, and we refuse to grab hold of His promise to carry us above the tumult.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #148 - Martin Luther
Quote of the Day #144 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #145 - Melancthon W. Jacobus
Quote of the Day #146 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, August 08, 2011

What Curse On The Ground Was God Talking About After The Flood? (Part 1) - Genesis 8:21 Bible Commentary


This is part one in a three part series.

Around 600 years before the flood, when the world was not yet 2000 years old, a boy was born. The boy's father, Lamech, chose to name his son "Noah"— meaning rest. Lamech, explaining why he chose the name "Noah", uttered these words:
This one will give us rest from our work and from the toil of our hands arising from the ground which the LORD has cursed. (Genesis 5:29)
Fast forward around 600 years. The flood was over, and God spoke the following words to Himself; He spoke these words within Himself, in His heart:
I will never again curse the ground on account of man, for the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth... (Genesis 8:21)
The words, I will never again curse the ground", lead to the obvious conclusion that sometime prior to the flood: God cursed the ground. But what curse is being referred to?

Some think that the curse being referred to is the flood— a view that lacks sense because nowhere is the flood specifically referred to as a curse. It also seems an unlikely conclusion because Scripture specifically mentions two different curses given by God before the flood, both of which involved the ground.

Next >>

Related Posts:
What Curse On The Ground Was God Talking About After The Flood? (Part 2)
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born - Genesis 5:25
The Lord Smelled The Soothing Aroma - Genesis 8:21
The Fall: Merciful Curses - The Christian Worldview

Saturday, August 06, 2011

Quote of the Day #146 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon on what to do when you lose the company of Chirst:
Tell me where you lost the company of Christ, and I will tell you the most likely place for you to find him again. Did you lose the company of Christ by forgetting prayer, and becoming slack in your devotion? Have you lost Christ in the closet? Then you will find him there. Did you lose Christ through some sin? Then you will find him in no other way but by the giving up of the sin, and seeking by the Holy Spirit to mortify the member in which the lust doth dwell. Did you lose Christ by neglecting the Scriptures? Then you must find Christ in the Scriptures; where you lost him, you will find him. It is a true saying, "Look for a thing where you dropped it, for it is there."
~Charles Spurgeon (A Lost Christ Found 2611.101)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #147 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #143 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #144 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #145 - Melancthon W. Jacobus
Quote Index

Friday, August 05, 2011

The Lord Smelled The Soothing Aroma - Genesis 8:21 Bible Commentary

The LORD smelled the soothing aroma; and the LORD said to Himself, “I will never again curse the ground on account of man, for the intent of man’s heart is evil from his youth; and I will never again destroy every living thing, as I have done. (Genesis 8:21)
The blazing fire Noah lit on the altar crackled its way through the skin of the offering— eventually reducing everything to ashes. The stench arising from the scene could not have been pleasant— and no human would have described the smell as a "soothing aroma".

God, however, does describe the smell as a "soothing aroma". But why? Obviously it was not the death-filled odor that God found pleasing. Neither was it merely Noah's outward act of burning animals, in and of itself, that God found soothing. After all, the Old Testament is filled with statements like this:
For You do not delight in sacrifice, otherwise I would give it;
You are not pleased with burnt offering.
The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit;
A broken and a contrite heart, O God, You will not despise.
(Psalm 51:16-17)
Ultimately, it comes down to this: God found Noah's burnt offering soothing because of the heart of the one who offered it. The burnt offering Noah offered up was a genuine act, motivated by a love for God. The offering was also a picture of what was to come: the final aroma— the aroma of Christ.

Burnt offerings were rightly present throughout the Old Testament, and beginning with Moses, such offerings were clearly commanded. But Jesus Christ is the fulfillment of the Old Testament. Jesus Christ put an end to burnt offerings, by offering up His blood— for without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness (Hebrews 9:22). Jesus Christ gave Himself up for us, an offering and a sacrifice to God as a fragrant aroma (Ephesians 5:2).

Related Posts:
What Curse On The Ground Was God Talking About After The Flood? - Genesis 8:21
Cain and Abel: An Offering - Genesis 4:3-5
Noah Builds The First Post-Flood Altar - Genesis 8:20
Noah Leaves The Ark - Genesis 8:18-19
A New Year, A New Era, A New World - Genesis 8:13

Thursday, August 04, 2011

Quote of the Day #145 - Melancthon W. Jacobus


A quote from Melancthon W. Jacobus:
Theology is the highest of all sciences... Though the direct object of the Scriptures is not to teach science, yet neither is the Bible unscientific— nor has it been found at variance with well-established science in any particular. The Scriptures do not even give us a system of theology, nor aim to teach theology scientifically, but they give us the truths themselves, which must form the only true system and science of theology.
~Melancthon W. Jacobus (Notes, Critical And Explanatory, On The Book Of Genesis)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #146 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #142 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #143 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #144 - William Gurnall
Quote Index

Wednesday, August 03, 2011

Noah Builds The First Post-Flood Altar - Genesis 8:20 Bible Commentary

Then Noah built an altar to the LORD, and took of every clean animal and of every clean bird and offered burnt offerings on the altar. (Genesis 8:20)
It must have been a long, yet joyful day for Noah: the joy of leaving the ark, the joy of a change in scenery, the joy of unloading the animals... by the time all was finished, perhaps darkness was beginning to fall. But still, there was another joy, and yet, in a sense, fear, to be experienced: the task of building an altar to the LORD.

The reason why Noah could offer up clean animals without causing the extinction of the entire species was simple: over a year ago, when he had loaded the ark, he had brought two of every animal— except for the clean animals. Of the clean animals, he had brought fourteen, seven of each gender. Those extra animals were now about to serve their purpose: they would soon be slaughtered.

And so, Noah began building the altar (perhaps making use of some of the loose rocks which must have been readily available on top the Ararat Mountains). Soon enough, smoke began to arise from the completed altar. One by one, or perhaps several at a time, Noah offered up the animals.

The contrast could not have been any greater. Around Noah: new life was blossoming, refilling the post-flood world. But in front of Noah: a violent, bloody offering. Noah clearly knew, especially after the flood, that he was a sinner— alive only because of the mercy of God. Sin was not to be played with, and atonement was certainly needed.

But Noah's offering was only a temporary solution. Noah's offering did not take away sin, but only covered it. Over 2000 years later, a sacrifice would take away sin: Jesus Christ would come. And He would die for all those who walk by faith— including Noah, of whom Hebrews states: By faith Noah, being warned by God about things not yet seen, in reverence prepared an ark for the salvation of his household, by which he condemned the world, and became an heir of the righteousness which is according to faith. (Hebrews 11:7)

Related Posts:
The Lord Smelled The Soothing Aroma - Genesis 8:21
Noah Leaves The Ark - Genesis 8:18-19
A New Year, A New Era, A New World - Genesis 8:13
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14

Tuesday, August 02, 2011

Quote of the Day #144 - William Gurnall


A quote from William Gurnall:
Christian, this is imperative for you to realize: When wicked or unclean thoughts first force their way into your mind, you have not yet sinned. This is the work of the devil! But if you so much as offer them a chair and begin polite conversation with them, you have become his accomplice. In only a short time you will give these thoughts sanctuary in your heart. Your resolve- not to yield to a temptation you are already entertaining-- is no match for Satan and the longings of the flesh.
~William Gurnall (The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One, Chapter 3, Part 2)

This quote was taken from the book The Christian In Complete Armor Volume One - A modernized abridgement of the Puritan Classic by William Gurnall, published by Banner Of Truth.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #145 - Melancthon W. Jacobus
Quote of the Day #141 - William Gurnall
Quote of the Day #142 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #143 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, August 01, 2011

Noah Leaves The Ark - Genesis 8:18-19 Bible Commentary


So Noah went out, and his sons and his wife and his sons’ wives with him. Every beast, every creeping thing, and every bird, everything that moves on the earth, went out by their families from the ark. (Genesis 8:18-19)
The waters of the flood had finally receded, and the land had finally become dry. Not one person had survived— except for, by God's grace, Noah and his household. When the command from God came that they should leave the ark, Noah and his household must have been eager to leave (they had, after all, spent over a year on the ark).

Noah and his household became the first people to set foot in the new post-flood world. Those first few steps on something different— on something firm, on something other than the gopher wood of the ark— must have seemed heavenly.

The view, indeed, must have been splendid. They were perched up in the Ararat Mountains. No longer were they surrounded by the same wooden walls, but by a birds-eye view of a world that was, in a sense, just beginning. All around the mountains, plants were beginning to spring up and retake the once flooded land.

It certainly must have been tempting for Noah and his household to look at such a world and think that it had been cleansed. But if they had done so, they would have had to have forgotten about who they were. The world might have been cleansed, but they had not been completely cleansed. Sin was still present. And however heavenly those first few steps might have been, they must have quickly remembered that they were walking upon earth— not heaven.

Related Posts:
Noah Builds The First Post-Flood Altar - Genesis 8:20
The Command Noah Waited So Long For - Genesis 8:14-17
Noah's Obedience - Genesis 6:22
Evidence for a Global Flood: Water Above The Mountains - Genesis 7:19-20
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14