Monday, February 28, 2011

The Animals Come To Noah - Genesis 6:19-20


The flood which soon strike the earth was a judgment on man. However, due to the nature of the judgment, everything on the face of the earth with the breath of life would also be destroyed. This, of course, included every animal living upon the earth. Thus God commanded Noah:
And of every living thing of all flesh, you shall bring two of every kind into the ark, to keep them alive with you; they shall be male and female. Of the birds after their kind, and of the animals after their kind, of every creeping thing of the ground after its kind, two of every kind will come to you to keep them alive. (Genesis 6:19-20)
Just as Noah would ensure the survival of the human species, so each animal pair would ensure the survival of their species. Gathering every single species of animal upon the face of the earth would certainly have been a laborious task for Noah. However, it appears that God conducted this "gathering" Himself. In verse 20, God states that two of every kind will come to you. Noah did not go out looking for the animals, the animals came looking for him!

Fish were not a part of the diverse crew which boarded the ark. Aquatic life was excluded... for obvious reasons. This, however, is not the first passage in which Scripture makes a distinction between land life and water life. At the creation of the world, Adam gave names to all the cattle, and to the birds of the sky, and to every beast of the field (Genesis 2:20). But nowhere does it mention that Adam gave names to all aquatic life. Assuming that the pre-flood world did not invent the submarine, only in the modern era has man plummeted the depths of the ocean, and, as a result, discovered (and named) some of the strangest creatures of God's creation.

As Noah began constructing the ark, the creatures of the earth made their way to that salvic scene— they made their way in order that the things of earth might be preserved for future generations. For even after the flood had ended, man would still rule over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the sky and over the cattle and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth. (Genesis 1:26).

Related Posts:
Did Noah Gather "Vegetarian" Food? - Genesis 6:21
God's Covenant With Noah: Promised - Genesis 6:18
State Of The World (2469 BC): 120 Years Before The Flood - Genesis 6:3
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14
Noah Found Favor In The Eyes Of The LORD - Genesis 6:8

Saturday, February 26, 2011

Quote of the Day #83 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
What the sun is to the heavens, that the doctrine of a vicarious satisfaction is to theology. Atonement is the brain and spinal cord of Christianity. Take away the cleansing blood, and what is left to the guilty? Deny the substitutionary work of Jesus, and you have denied all that is precious in the New Testament.
~Charles Spurgeon (765.449)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #84 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #80 - John Calvin
Quote of the Day #81 - George Whitefield
Quote of the Day #82 - Cotton Mather
Quote Index

Friday, February 25, 2011

God's Covenant With Noah: Promised - Genesis 6:18


The men of pre-flood world had given themselves over to ungodly pleasures. They did not seek God, but despised Him. As a result, the waters of the judgment of God would soon come upon them.

God Himself said, "Behold, I, even I am bringing the flood of water upon the earth" (Genesis 6:17). The coming of this flood was certain. In a sense, it was promised, but God had a much different promise in store for Noah:
But I will establish My covenant with you; and you shall enter the ark--you and your sons and your wife, and your sons' wives with you. (Genesis 6:18)
The world did not find favor in the eyes of the Lord, but Noah did find favor in the eyes of the Lord. The waters of the flood would soon come crashing down upon the pre-flood world, but Noah would be spared from those waters. Noah, along with seven others in his immediate family, would be saved, but the rest of the world would be destroyed.

The mercy that God showed to Noah in rescuing him from the flood was certainly great, but even greater was that God would establish His covenant with Noah. A covenant is a compact— a promise. And unlike deceiving and unreliable men, God is always faithful to His word. The details of the covenant that God would establish with Noah are not indicated in this passage (they were not revealed to Noah until after the flood in Genesis 9:9-17).

The simple fact that God would seek to make a covenant with a man is indescribably gracious. Who would have thought that God would give any fallen man such grace? That God loves men is a truth of unspeakable proportions!

God. Stooping down. Giving grace to fallen man. It is the story of Scripture— the story of all of history. God's promises are indeed precious. And at the dusk of the pre-flood era, God's grace was not exhausted, but was just beginning.

Related Posts:
The Animals Come To Noah - Genesis 6:19-20
The Coming Flood of the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 6:17
State Of The World (2469 BC): 120 Years Before The Flood - Genesis 6:3
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14
Noah Found Favor In The Eyes Of The LORD - Genesis 6:8

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Quote of the Day #82 - Cotton Mather


A quote from Cotton Mather:
Knowledge, Knowledge; To get good Knowledge, let that be the First Care of them that would be Saved. Knowledge, 'Tis a Principal thing; My Child, Get Knowledge; with all thy might, Get understanding. Oh! That this Resolution might immediately be made in the minds of all our people; I will get as much Knowledge as ever I can!

The Word of God must be Read and Heard with Diligence that so you may arrive to the Knowledge that is needful for you.

The Catechisms in which you have the Word of God fitted for your more early Apprehension of it must be diligently Studied.

Unto all the other Means of Knowledge, there must be added, Humble and Earnest Supplications before the Glorious Lord, You must cry to God for Knowledge, and lift up your Voice to Him for Understanding; Prefer it before Silver, Before any Earthy Treasures.
~Cotton Mather (What Must I Do To Be Saved?)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #83 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #79 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #80 - John Calvin
Quote of the Day #81 - George Whitefield
Quote Index

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

The Coming Flood of the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 6:17


After commanding Noah to build an ark, God informs Noah in Genesis 6:17 exactly why he would need such a massive ark:
Behold, I, even I am bringing the flood of water upon the earth, to destroy all flesh in which is the breath of life, from under heaven; everything that is on the earth shall perish. (Genesis 6:17)
The pre-flood world would be judged with a flood of water, but this flood was not a natural disaster. This flood was a supernatural disaster— a supernatural judgment. The coming flood was not a gift from mother nature. Mother nature does not reign over the weather in the universe, God reigns over the weather in the universe. He is the one who is in control.

God is the one who would send the flood. And this flood would not be of minuscule proportions. This flood would not merely glaze the local area. Instead, this flood would fill the whole world. It would destroy all flesh— everything under heaven. Everything on the earth would perish (not just the few unlucky individuals who happened to live near Noah).

Water is meant to be a source of nourishment. It is a gift from God enjoyed by both the righteous and wicked: He causes His sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. (Matthew 5:45). But because of sin, water which was created to nourish the body, can also be used to bring about the destruction of the body.

When the pre-flood world refused to drink the water of life, they received in return waters of death. When man refuses to drink from that water which would forever quench his thirst (John 4:14), then there is no hope. The pre-flood world repeatedly denied this water, and although God strived with them, they refused to embrace Him. Thus the flood was coming, and the ark over the next 120 years would stand as a condemnation of the world.

Related Posts:
God's Covenant With Noah: Promised - Genesis 6:18
State Of The World (2469 BC): 120 Years Before The Flood - Genesis 6:3
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14
The Pre-Flood World Soon To Be Blotted Out - Genesis 6:7
Noah Found Favor In The Eyes Of The LORD - Genesis 6:8

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

Quote of the Day #81 - George Whitefield


This quote comes from Joseph Beaumont Wakeley's Anecdotes of the rev. George Whitefield, M.A., with biographical sketch:
    There is such a thing as spiritual merchandise. Solomon says, in regard to wisdom, "The merchandise of it is better than the merchandise of silver; and the gain thereof, than fine gold." Mr. Whitefield, on one occasion while preaching in Philadelphia, cried out in the midst of the sermon, "I am going to turn merchant to-day. I have valuable commodities to offer for sale, but I say not, as your merchants do, If you will come up to my price I'll sell to you; but, If you will come down to my price; for if you have a farthing to bring you cannot be a purchaser." They were urged to "buy the truth;" to "buy wine and milk without money and without price."

"See from the Rock a fountain rise;
For you in healing streams it rolls;
Money ye need not bring, nor price,
Ye lab'ring, burdened, sin-sick souls."

During the sermon a broken-hearted man took courage, and his language was,

"In my hands no price I bring;
Simply to the cross I cling."

He bought without money and without price, and returned home in possession of true riches.
~George Whitefield/Joseph Beaumont Wakeley (Anecdotes of the rev. George Whitefield, M.A., with biographical sketch, page 133, 1872)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #82 - Cotton Mather
Quote of the Day #78 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #79 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #80 - John Calvin
Quote Index

Monday, February 21, 2011

State Of The World (2469 BC): 120 Years Before The Flood - Genesis 6:3

Then the LORD said, "My Spirit shall not strive with man forever, because he also is flesh; nevertheless his days shall be one hundred and twenty years." (Genesis 6:3)
Just over 1500 years after creation, the world, with all its might, was pursuing the broad path to destruction. As death and bloodshed exploded upon the earth, man did not turn to God, but to himself. In doing so, man gave himself over to the vilest of passions, a vileness which the sons of God only increased.

Around the year 2469 BC, Noah was 480 years of age. Of Noah's ancestors, only Lamech (Noah's father) and Methuselah (Noah's grandfather) remained alive. Adam and Seth had long ago died. When Noah was born, the reality of natural death was just beginning to sink into humanity. Within the first 480 years of Noah's life, Enos, Cainan, Mahalaleel, and Jared had all died. The reality of natural death, by this point, had been set firmly in stone.


This was a new era of human history, and it was darker than it had ever been before. The storm clouds were already on the horizon; rain was on the way. God Himself had made it clear that man would have only 120 more years. After that, the flood would come. God would judge the earth and all people would be blotted out, except for Noah and the seven others who would board the ark. Noah was thus commanded to construct an ark— a construction project so massive that he might not have finished it until shortly before the flood.

The world was certainly in a sad state. Violence filled the earth. All people on the face of the earth were wicked, except for Noah. The righteous remnant at this point in history was indeed small. The Genesis account even leaves open to question whether Lamech and Methuselah were among the righteous. Neither of them are mentioned to have found favor with God (as is mentioned of Noah in Genesis 6:8).

Enoch, a preacher of righteousness, had been taken up by God prior to Noah's brith. In a sense, Noah replaced him. He was now the one who warned the world of the coming judgment. Noah, according to 2 Peter 2:5 was a preacher of righteousness. Hebrews 11:7 states that Noah in reverence prepared an ark for the salvation of his household, by which he condemned the world, and became an heir of the righteousness which is according to faith.

The world was marching to its coming doom. The storm clouds on the horizon did nothing to quench man's desire for perversion. Man refused to give glory to the Creator. At 480 years of age, Noah's sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth, had not yet been born. Noah was seemingly alone in the world. At the most, he was married to a godly wife. And in such a twisted world, they must have found great comfort in one another as they waited for the coming flood.

<< Prev | Next >>

Related Posts:
State of the World (2349 BC): The Flood (Part 1) - Genesis 7:11
The Coming Flood of the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 6:17
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14
Noah Found Favor In The Eyes Of The LORD - Genesis 6:8

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Submit A Quote

If you have an interesting quote from someone that you want to share, feel free to submit the quote in an email and send it to priceless.eternity@gmail.com (for a full listing of all the quotes on Priceless Eternity click here). Before you submit a quote, make sure it meets the guidelines below. Even if a quote meets all the guidelines, it does not necessarily guarantee that the quote will be posted.

  • The quote must align with the biblical worldview and the content on Priceless Eternity.
  • The quote should be profound or especially interesting.
  • Do not submit a book of the day, submit a quote of the day (at the most, a couple paragraphs).
  • Provide the source from which you obtained the quote. If the quote is from a book, include the title, date the book was published, and the page number. If the quote is from a sermon, include a link to the sermon and the minute in which the quote was spoken.
  • The quote cannot be a previous quote of the day. If are unsure if the quote has been previously posted, go ahead and submit the quote.

Friday, February 18, 2011

How Big Was Noah's Ark? - Genesis 6:15-16


How big was Noah's ark? Could the ark really have held thousands of animals? Exactly how much space did the ark actually take up? Genesis 6:15-16 provides answers to these questions:
This is how you shall make it: the length of the ark three hundred cubits, its breadth fifty cubits, and its height thirty cubits. You shall make a window for the ark, and finish it to a cubit from the top; and set the door of the ark in the side of it; you shall make it with lower, second, and third decks. (Genesis 6:15-16)
In order to grasp the size of the ark, this question must be answered: How big is a cubit? The answer to this question, as might be expected, has often been debated. Some think that the cubit in this passage is about 18 inches in length. Others think that the cubit in this passage is around 22 inches in length. It's the safest option simply to make measurements with the 18 inch cubit, but it should be kept in mind that the cubit in this passage might have been larger.

Assuming that a cubit is about 18 inches in length, calculations can be made with ease. The ark was 450 feet in length, 75 feet in width, and 45 feet in height. The floor area of each of the three decks of the ark was about 33,750 square feet. Summing up the area of all three decks gives an enormous floor area of 101,250 square feet!

At 1,518,750 cubic feet, the volume of the ark was absolutely massive. To put that into perspective, Noah's ark could have held about 11,358,765 gallons of water. It's interesting to point out that if the cubit in this passage is 22 inches in length, then the volume of the ark was about 2,772,917 cubic feet, almost twice as large as the volume of the ark with the 18 inch cubit.

This passage also mentions what seems to be a trivial detail: there was a window on the ark. However, this window does play a somewhat significant role. Once the flood ended, Noah opened the window. He sent a raven out of the ark through the window once, and he sent out a dove through the window three times (Genesis 8:6-12). Thus, while the dimensions of the window are not given, it can be safely assumed that the window was at least as large as a raven or dove.

Related Posts:
God's Ark Which Noah Built - Genesis 6:14
Noah Sends Out An Unsymbolical Dove - Genesis 8:8-12
The Coming Flood of the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 6:17
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
Man in the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3

Thursday, February 17, 2011

Quote of the Day #80 - John Calvin


A quote from John Calvin's Institutes of the Christian Religion:
It is not the will of God, however, that we should forget the primeval dignity which he bestowed on our first parents - a dignity which may well stimulate us to the pursuit of goodness and justice. It is impossible for us to think of our first original, or the end for which we were created, without being urged to meditate on immortality, and to seek the kingdom of God. But such meditation, so far from raising our spirits, rather casts them down, and makes us humble. For what is our original? One from which we have fallen. What the end of our creation? One from which we have altogether strayed, so that, weary of our miserable lot, we groan, and groaning sigh for a dignity now lost. When we say that man should see nothing in himself which can raise his spirits, our meaning is, that he possesses nothing on which he can proudly plume himself.
~John Calvin (Institutes of the Christian Religion, Book II, Chapter 1 - Translated by Henry Beveridge)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #81 - George Whitefield
Quote of the Day #77 - A. W. Pink
Quote of the Day #78 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #79 - John Owen
Quote Index

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

God's Ark Which Noah Built (Part 2) - Genesis 6:14


Christ alone can take away sin, animal sacrifices cannot (Hebrews 10:4). From the beginning of the world, God planned that Christ would become flesh. From the beginning, God knew that Noah and his family would be the lone survivors of the flood. He knew that the Messiah would be a descendant of Noah— that the Messiah would be the only way in which man could find favor. The saving of Noah from the flood was part of God's plan from the beginning. Thus God, in order that his purposes would be brought about, commanded Noah:
Make for yourself an ark of gopher wood; you shall make the ark with rooms, and shall cover it inside and out with pitch. (Genesis 6:14)
Nobody knows exactly what gopher wood is (or at least, no one who is alive knows). Commentators suggest various types of wood that this passage could be referring to: cypress, pine, cedar, and more... The most that can be said with certainty is this: Noah made an ark. He made it out of some type of wood. And the wood that he used was named after a gopher (because, after all, gopher's like wood).

As described Genesis 6:14, the ark had rooms... it wasn't just a giant empty wooden tub. The gopher wood structure of the ark was covered with pitch. Concerning the pitch on the inside of the ark, John Gill, in his commentary on this verse, states that it served to "take off the ill smell that might arise". The pitch on the outside held the ark together, which prevented leaks, thus enabling it to float.

The type of wood and the pitch are just the first among many details which the book of Genesis gives about the ark. The next few verses provide much more information, especially regarding the dimensions of the ark.

<< Prev

Related Posts:
How Big Was Noah's Ark? - Genesis 6:15-16
Noah Found Favor In The Eyes Of The LORD - Genesis 6:8
The Pre-Flood World Soon To Be Blotted Out - Genesis 6:7
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
Man in the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3

Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Quote of the Day #79 - John Owen


A quote from John Owen:
A man may easier see without eyes, speak without a tongue, than truly mortify one sin without the Spirit.
~John Owen (Of The Mortification Of Sin In Believers, Part 2, Chapter 7)

This quote was taken from the book Overcoming Sin and Temptation, Three Classic Works By John Owen, published by Crossway in 2006.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #80 - John Calvin
Quote of the Day #76 - John MacArthur
Quote of the Day #77 - A. W. Pink
Quote of the Day #78 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, February 14, 2011

God's Ark Which Noah Built (Part 1) - Genesis 6:14

Make for yourself an ark of gopher wood; you shall make the ark with rooms, and shall cover it inside and out with pitch. (Genesis 6:14)
On the surface level, the ark belonged to Noah— it was Noah's ark. But on a deeper level, the earth is the LORD's and all it contains. All that the earth contains includes Noah's ark. The ark belonged to Noah in the sense that he built it, but in another sense, the ark belonged to God— God is the one who made the wood, which Noah used to make the ark.

If it were not for the fact that Noah found favor with God, Genesis 6:14 would not exist. If Noah had not found favor with God, there would have been no ark; there would have been no future for humanity. However, as is stated in Genesis 6:8, Noah did find favor with God. This leads to an interesting question: Since Noah found favor with God, was God "required" to save Noah from the flood?

Throughout history, believers have faced many tribulations. Believers have faced torture and martyrdom— they have faced the consequences of their sin. Moses, for instance, was not allowed to enter the promise land. And why was he not allowed to enter? ...because of sin that was in his life.

Similar to Moses, Noah was not totally free from sin. Noah was not perfect. God would have been perfectly just to let Noah perish in the flood. However, if Noah had perished in the flood, he would have been cast into hell. This is because that without Noah, Christ would not have come to the earth (for Jesus was born many generation after Noah). Without Noah, the descendants of Adam would have come to an end. God never would have become flesh in order to atone for sin. All of humanity would have been blotted out.

Next >>

Related Posts:
God's Ark Which Noah Built (Part 2) - Genesis 6:14
Noah Found Favor In The Eyes Of The LORD - Genesis 6:8
The Pre-Flood World Soon To Be Blotted Out - Genesis 6:7
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
Man in the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Quote of the Day #78 - Charles Spurgeon


An interesting quote from Charles Spurgeon:
We can see, in looking at Luther, great and glorious Luther, how Romanism tinged all that he did more or less; and the darkness of the age cast some gloom even over the serene and steadfast soul of Calvin; of each one of the reformers we must say the same; bright stars as all of these were, yet they kept not themselves untarnished by the sphere in which they shone. Every man is more or less affected by his age, and we are obliged, as we read history, to make continual allowances, for we all admit that it would not be fair to judge the men of former times by the standard of the nineteenth century.
~Charles Spurgeon (1327.678)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #79 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #75 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #76 - John MacArthur
Quote of the Day #77 - A. W. Pink
Quote Index

Friday, February 11, 2011

The Pre-Flood World: Filled With Violence (Part 3) - Genesis 6:11-13


The cruelest act of violence in the pre-flood world was not the murder of Abel. It was not Lamech's murder, and it was not the immorality of the sons of God. Rather, the cruelest act of violence in the pre-flood world was the war that man declared on God. To murder another person is a great offense, but to seek to knock God off His throne is an even greater atrocity.

Without Jesus Christ, all men would be at war with God. There would be no offer for peace and no hope for peace. True peace can only be found in the Lord Jesus Christ. Men on this earth may think they have obtained peace when they are safe and secure— pleased with their accomplishments. Men may think they are at peace for many (and often foolish) reasons, but all such peace is temporary if it is not found in Jesus Christ.

Not only is it cruel, but it is absurd to be at war with God. God cannot be knocked off His throne. He is unmovable, unshakable. He reigns eternally, having absolute and infinite power over all things. No matter how many wicked men seek to destroy Him, He endures in strength.

Though the men of the pre-flood world had declared war on God, there was no chance for victory. All their fighting and raging was in vain. God destroys those who speak falsehood (Psalm 5:6). He abhors the man of bloodshed and deceit (Psalm 5:6). Thus God spoke to Noah:
Then God said to Noah, "The end of all flesh has come before Me; for the earth is filled with violence because of them; and behold, I am about to destroy them with the earth. (Genesis 6:13)
The men of the pre-flood world were at war with God. Though God strived with them, they refused to lay down their weapons; they continued in their violence and corruption. Thus judgment was coming. Those who refused to live for God's glory would die in the flood, and then, at the final judgment, be subject to eternal death.

Praise God for His justice! Praise God that He saves those who are undeserving of grace and undeserving of life! Great is His grace that is lavished on those who believe!

<< Prev

Related Posts:
God's Ark Which Noah Built (Part 1) - Genesis 6:14
The Pre-Flood World Soon To Be Blotted Out - Genesis 6:7
How Bad Is Sin? (Part 1)
Why Is Sin Unavoidable? (Part 1)
Man in the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Quote of the Day #77 - A. W. Pink


This quote is taken from A. W. Pink's book, The Sovereignty of God:
To declare that the Creator's original plan has been frustrated by sin, is to dethrone God. To suggest that God was taken by surprise in Eden and that He is now attempting to remedy an unforeseen calamity, is to degrade the Most High to the level of a finite, erring mortal.
~A. W. Pink (The Sovereignty of God, Chapter: The Sovereignty of God Defined)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #78 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #53 - A. W. Pink
Quote of the Day #75 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #76 - John MacArthur
Quote Index

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

The Pre-Flood World: Filled With Violence (Part 2) - Genesis 6:11-13


According to Genesis 6:12, the pre-flood world was filled with violence. Concerning what God thinks of violence, Psalm 11 states:
...And the one who loves violence His soul hates. (Psalm 11:5)
In the time before the flood, the book of Genesis mentions only a few specific violent crimes. Shortly after the fall, the most famous of these crimes was executed: Cain murdered the righteous Abel (see Genesis 4:8). Later, the book of Genesis also mentions that Lamech killed a man (see Genesis 4:23). However, these violent crimes were were just two among many other violent crimes committed in the pre-flood world. As the human population expanded and as the wickedness of man grew greater, violence also expanded until it filled the earth.

It would be reasonable to speculate that by the time of the flood, full-fledged wars were taking place; evil men fought evil men so that they could increase their evilness. In such wars, there would not have been a "good" side and a "bad" side. There would not have been one side fighting for justice and one side fighting for corruption. But there would have been two bad sides, competing against the other, in an effort to advance their lusts. Concerning the wicked, Psalm 7 states:
His mischief will return upon his own head,
And his violence will descend upon his own plate. (Psalm 7:16)
Man's selfish violence in the pre-flood world did not result in the formation of a utopia on earth. Instead, man's love of violence made him an enemy of God. The violence through which men sought to gain victory would be returned upon their own plates in a ferocious flood.

<< Prev | Next >>

Related Posts:
The Pre-Flood World: Filled With Violence (Part 3) - Genesis 6:11-13
Noah: Blameless In His Time - Genesis 6:9-10
The Pre-Flood World Soon To Be Blotted Out - Genesis 6:7
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
Cain and Abel: Two Routes - Genesis 4:1-2

Tuesday, February 08, 2011

Quote of the Day #76 - John MacArthur


A quote from John MacArthur on the heart of worship:
Worship begins with an attitude. It is the inner heart of adoring praise that is the essence of real worship. External worship, shallow superficial observance is intolerable to God. Isaiah 29:13 says, "This people draw near Me with their mouth and with their lips they do honor Me, but every move of their heart far from Me." That is a dishonor to God. Jesus said God is a spirit and they that worship Him must worship Him in spirit and in truth. It has to rise from deep inside.

The true worshiper is the one whose heart is devoted to adoring God with total sincerity, the one who deep down has profound gratitude to God. And that's where it has to come from, not on the surface. It cannot be shallow. It cannot be in any sense superficial. That is frankly intolerable to God. It has to come from deep inside the soul and spirit. As it were, untouched by circumstances, it rises because of what we know to be true about our God and His great work.
~John MacArthur (Mary's Praise - 3/28/1999)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #77 - A. W. Pink
Quote of the Day #73 - Augustine
Quote of the Day #74 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #75 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, February 07, 2011

The Pre-Flood World: Filled With Violence (Part 1) - Genesis 6:11-13


After the short description of Noah (Genesis 6:9), who was blameless in his time, the book of Genesis describes the wickedness of that time:
Now the earth was corrupt in the sight of God, and the earth was filled with violence. God looked on the earth, and behold, it was corrupt; for all flesh had corrupted their way upon the earth. Then God said to Noah, "The end of all flesh has come before Me; for the earth is filled with violence because of them; and behold, I am about to destroy them with the earth. (Genesis 6:11-13)
God was about to inflict judgment upon mankind. He was about to bring catastrophe upon the earth. The explanation for why such devastation was about to occur is simple: devastation was about to come upon man because the earth was filled with wickedness. In order to grasp just how great the wickedness of the pre-flood world was, all that needs to be done is to look at how the wickedness was punished.

Judgment was about to come because the earth was corrupt in the sight of God. What men see is of little importance. Doubtless, the men of Noah's day must have deluded themselves into seeing a much brighter picture of the human race: man certainly wasn't corrupt... yes... man was on the upward climb. The future looked bright. Despite a few minor moral faults, more progress would be made and the happiness of the human population would certainly increase!

But what men see matters very little compared to what God sees. God did not see man on an upward climb toward greatness. God did not see humanity advancing in a better direction. The deceitfulness and folly of sin may have convinced men to believe that God was blind; it may have convinced them to believe that God was not in control— that He was unsure of what the future might bring. But though the minds of men consistently construct new gods according to their desires, God does not change. Ultimately, it does not matter what men see, but what God sees. And what God saw was that the earth was corrupt; He saw that the earth was filled with violence.

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The Pre-Flood World: Filled With Violence (Part 2) - Genesis 6:11-13
Noah: Blameless In His Time - Genesis 6:9-10
The Pre-Flood World Soon To Be Blotted Out - Genesis 6:7
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
Who Are the Sons of God? - Genesis 6:1-4

Saturday, February 05, 2011

Quote of the Day #75 - Charles Spurgeon


A quote from Charles Spurgeon, taken from his commentary on Psalm 53:1 (The fool hath said in his heart, There is no God...):
And this he does because he is a fool. Being a fool he speaks according to his nature; being a great fool he meddles with a great subject, and comes to a wild conclusion. The atheist is, morally as well as mentally, a fool, a fool in the heart as well as in the head; a fool in morals as well as in philosophy. With the denial of God as a starting point, we may well conclude that the fool's progress is a rapid, riotous, raving, ruinous one. He who begins at impiety is ready for anything.

No God, being interpreted, means no law, no order, no restraint to lust, no limit to passion. Who but a fool would be of this mind?
~Charles Spurgeon (The Treasury of David, Psalm 53:1)

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Quote of the Day #76 - John MacArthur
Quote of the Day #72 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #73 - Augustine
Quote of the Day #74 - John Owen
Quote Index

Friday, February 04, 2011

Outline of Matthew 1


Below is a list of the pages on Priceless Eternity which cover Matthew 1. To view a larger listing of pages on other parts of Scripture go to the Scripture Index.

Matthew 1
Summary of Matthew 1 The Gospel of Matthew opens with a genealogy— an important genealogy. A unique genealogy. A genealogy that demonstrates that Jesus is genealogically qualified to be the Messiah. Dispersed throughout the genealogy is historic commentary, which causes the reader familiar with the Old Testament to recall...

Matthew 1:1-17
The Lineage of the Messiah In the midst of a world that was seeking temporal pleasure— in the midst of a world that refused to worship God— in the midst of this world, there were some people who were awaiting deliverance. This group of people was expecting the Messiah, who according to the Scriptures, would be a descendant of David...

Matthew 1:18
Mary's Embarrassing Privilege Mary was pregnant, but not yet married. She was living among Jewish people, many of whom would have most certainly seen her as unclean. Perhaps "embarrassing" privilege is lacking in severity. Since Mary was living among a people whose law...

Matthew 1:18
The Virgin Birth Matthew has already explored Jesus' lineage (see Matthew 1:1-17), but he is now about to describe the birth of Jesus Christ in greater detail. Now the birth of Jesus Christ was as follows... What Matthew is about to state is indisputable; it is exactly what happened and absolutely true, just as the rest of Scripture...

Matthew 1:19
Joseph's Dilemma Joseph, Mary's husband, is mentioned a few times in the beginning of Matthew and Luke; he is also mentioned one last time in connection with Jesus' childhood visit to the temple (Luke 2:41-52). Very little is written in Scripture concerning Joseph, especially in comparison to Mary. However, the book of Matthew does provide enough information to...

Matthew 1:20
Joseph, Do Not Be Afraid to Take Mary as Your Wife Joseph was afraid to take Mary as his wife. Perhaps he was afraid because of lawful reasons. Perhaps he was afraid because he did not want to bring dishonor to his family's name. However, when Joseph was still in the process of considering...

Matthew 1:21
Jesus' Purpose: To Save His People From Their Sins (Part 1) (Part 2) The virgin birth, in and of itself, was a great miracle, but the child to be born would bring about even greater miracles. In the past few verses, Matthew has mainly focused on Mary and Joseph. The emphasis has been on Mary's unique pregnancy, but now the emphasis shifts to the infant who is soon to be born...

Matthew 1:22-23
Isaiah's Prophecy (Part 1) (Part 2) Through Joseph's dream, Mary's innocence is confirmed. Mary is to give birth to a human child. The Child would go on to do things no human had ever done (and things that no human will ever do again). In Joseph's dream, the angel of the Lord did not directly state that the Child in Mary's womb was God Himself, but this truth could easily be implied— for what normal human being can save his people from their sins?

Matthew 1:24-25
Joseph's Obedience and Jesus' Birth After learning of Mary's pregnancy, Joseph had to decide how to respond. When he was leaning towards the conclusion to send Mary away secretly (Matthew 1:19), an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream. The angel's words revealed...

Related Posts:
Summary of Matthew 1
Outline of Genesis 5
Was the Virgin Birth Necessary? Why was the Virgin Birth So Important?
Christianity, Islam, and the Virgin Birth

Thursday, February 03, 2011

Quote of the Day #74 - John Owen


A quote from John Owen:
He that changes pride for worldliness, sensuality for Pharisaism, vanity in himself to the contempt of others, let him not think that he has mortified the sin that he seems to have left. He has changed his master, but is a servant still.
~John Owen (Of The Mortification Of Sin In Believers, Part 2, Chapter 5)

This quote was taken from the book Overcoming Sin and Temptation, Three Classic Works By John Owen, published by Crossway in 2006.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #75 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #55 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #72 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #73 - Augustine
Quote Index

Wednesday, February 02, 2011

Summary of Matthew 1


The Gospel of Matthew opens with a genealogy— an important genealogy. A unique genealogy. A genealogy that demonstrates that Jesus is genealogically qualified to be the Messiah. Dispersed throughout the genealogy is historic commentary, which causes the reader familiar with the Old Testament to recall the some of the major historical events which led to the coming of the Messiah.

Beginning with Abraham, the genealogy traces the lineage of the Messiah through Joseph, the husband of Mary, by whom Jesus was born (Matthew 1:16). The genealogy contains the names of many prominent Old Testament men: Abraham, Judah, David, Solomon, and Hezekiah. The genealogy is also unique in that it contains the names of several women: Tamar, Rahab, Ruth, Bathsheba, and Mary.

Matthew starts the genealogy with Abraham and eventually arrives at Jesus Himself. From there, Matthew begins a short account of the events leading up to the birth of Jesus. Concerning the virgin birth, all that Matthew writes of Mary is that she was found to be with child by the Holy Spirit (Matthew 1:18). Choosing to leave out Mary's encounter with the angel Gabriel (which Luke includes in Luke 1:26-38), Matthew instead focuses more on Joseph's dilemma.

Joseph was betrothed to Mary, soon to be married. All of a sudden, Mary was pregnant and Joseph had to decide what to do. Should he continue through with the marriage? Should he disgrace her? Should he put her away privately? When he was considering to put her away privately, an angel appeared to him in a dream and told him exactly what he should do— he should take Mary to be his wife and name the child Jesus. But the child that Mary would give birth to would not be an ordinary child. In fact, the child would do what God alone can do: save His people from their sins (Matthew 1:21).

It is at this point that Matthew interrupts the narrative with a short comment. He writes that everything was happening according to what the prophet Isaiah had said. In mentioning this, Matthew further demonstrates Jesus to be the Messiah by showing Him to be the fulfillment of Old Testament prophecy.

After Joseph awoke, he did as the angel commanded him in his dream. He was obedient to God and he took Mary to be his wife, despite her strange pregnancy. Matthew writes very little of the birth of Jesus, only stating that Mary gave birth to a Son (Matthew 1:25). This short account of the birth of Jesus sets the scene for an event which occurred a year or two after Jesus' birth: the visit of the magi (Matthew 2:1-12).

Related Posts:
Outline of Matthew 1
Summary of Genesis 5
Scripture Index
Was the Virgin Birth Necessary? Why was the Virgin Birth So Important?
Christianity, Islam, and the Virgin Birth

Tuesday, February 01, 2011

Quote of the Day #73 - Augustine


This is a quote from Henry Bettenson's translation (1972) of Augustine's book City of God regarding what the Christian's response to death should be:
Death is not to be regarded as a disaster, when it follows on a good life, for the only thing that makes death an evil is what comes after death. Those who must inevitably die ought not to worry overmuch about what accident will cause their death, but about their destination after dying. Christians know that the death of a poor religious man, licked by the tongues of dogs, is far better than the death of a godless rich man, dressed in purple and linen. Why then should those who have lived well be dismayed by the terrors of death in any form?
~Augustine (City of God (Penguin Classics), 1984, Book I, Chapter 11)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #74 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #70 - C. S. Lewis
Quote of the Day #71 - Steve Turner
Quote of the Day #72 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index