Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Quote of the Day #46 - Paul Washer

A quote from Paul Washer:
He [Jesus] knew no sin. Do you realize this? There has never been one moment in your life— not one moment in your life that wasn’t tainted by sin. And yet, there never was a moment in His life that was tainted by sin! Someone asked me a long time ago, "What is the greatest sin you can commit?" And all of a sudden it just popped in my head so I said it— I said, “Well, I suppose the greatest sin you could commit is to break the greatest commandment that’s ever been given: to love the Lord your God with all you heart, soul, mind, and strength.” Do you realize there’s never been one moment in your life that you have loved God as God ought to be loved? To even suggest that you have is paramount to blasphemy. You have never loved God in a way that God deserves to be loved. But there was never one moment in the life of the man Jesus Christ that He did not love God as God deserves to be loved! You think Jesus is great? He’s greater than you know...
~Paul Washer

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #47 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #43 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #44 - John Bunyan
Quote of the Day #45 - A. W. Pink
Quote Index

Monday, November 29, 2010

The Lineage of the Messiah - Matthew 1:1-17

In the midst of a world that was seeking temporal pleasure— in the midst of a world that refused to worship God— in the midst of this world, there were some people who were awaiting deliverance. This group of people was expecting the Messiah, who according to the Scriptures, would be a descendant of David (see The Messiah the Jews Expected).

The Gospel of Matthew begins with a record of Jesus' genealogy:
The record of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham: (Matthew 1:1)
The first verse of Matthew specifically points out two significant men in Jesus' genealogy: One of them is Abraham, the father of the Jewish people. The other is David, one of the great kings (a man after God's heart) who had formerly ruled God's people.

Matthew's purpose in mentioning these two men is likely done in order to show that Jesus is genealogically qualified to be the Messiah. The Scriptures are clear that the Messiah must be a descendant of David:
I have made a covenant with My chosen;
I have sworn to David My servant,
I will establish your seed forever
And build up your throne to all generations. (Psalm 89:3-4)
By stating that Jesus is the son of David (and is therefore also the son of Abraham), Matthew shows that Jesus is qualified to be the Messiah. The next several verses of this genealogy explore Jesus' lineage in greater detail. Beginning with Abraham, Matthew traces Jesus' genealogy to Joseph, the husband of Mary, by whom Jesus was born, who is called the Messiah (Matthew 1:16).

Compared to other genealogies in Scripture, Matthew's genealogy is unique in that it includes several women. Some of these women were prostitutes, saved by God's grace, a reminder of man's sin and need for deliverance. Throughout the genealogy, Matthew stops at certain points to provide historical commentary; the most notable of which is the mentioning of David, Bathsheba and Uriah.

Matthew's record of Jesus' genealogy contains many familiar names: Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Boaz, Ruth, David, Solomon, Hezekiah, and more. All of these people did not have the same amount of revelation that exists today. This lengthy genealogy should be an excellent reminder of the many people throughout history who did not live to see the Messiah. Many in this genealogy anticipated the Messiah's deliverance, but in this present age, men should look back with excitement at the deliverance that Christ brought. What a tragedy it is when the cross becomes commonplace!

Related Posts:
The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2
The Gospel (Part 1 of ∞) - The Christian Worldview
The Virgin Birth - Matthew 1:18
Isaiah's Prophecy: It's Fulfillment (Part 1) - Matthew 1:22-23
Jesus' Purpose: To Save His People From Their Sins (Part 1) - Matthew 1:21

Sunday, November 28, 2010

Calming the Storm - John MacArthur - Sermon Sunday

This sermon will give you an amazing picture of what it was like when Jesus calmed the storm (Mark 4:35-41). John MacArthur's vivid descriptions of the Sea of Galilee will likely give you a greater appreciation for Jesus' power over nature. Click here to listen to or read the sermon.

Related Posts:
Defending Your Faith - R. C. Sproul - Sermon Sunday
You Are Dearly Loved By God - Paul Washer - Sermon Sunday
Be Encouraged, Die to Self - I'll Be Honest - Sermon Sunday
A Call to Wonder - Paul Washer - Sermon Sunday
The Kingdom of Heaven is Like A Treasure - Paul Washer - Sermon Sunday

Saturday, November 27, 2010

Quote of the Day #45 - A. W. Pink

This quote is taken from A. W. Pink's book, The Sovereignty of God:
Mercy is not a right to which man is entitled. Mercy is that adorable attribute of God by which He pities and relieves the wretched.
~A. W. Pink (The Sovereignty of God, Chapter: The Sovereignty of God Defined)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #46 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #42 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #43 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #44 - John Bunyan
Quote Index

Friday, November 26, 2010

Outline of Genesis 5

Below is a list of the pages on Priceless Eternity which cover Genesis 5. To view a larger listing of pages on other parts of Scripture go to the Scripture Index.

Genesis 5
Summary of Genesis 5 Genesis 5 begins with a reminder of man's unique origin: Man was created in the image of God. At creation, God created them male and female. He commanded man to be fruitful and multiply (Genesis 1:28). Humanity was obedient to this command, thus the number of men in the world increased. Genesis 5 contains the genealogy of some of the most significant men of the pre-flood world...

Genesis 5
Genealogy Timeline This is a simple graphical representation of the genealogy in Genesis 5.

Genesis 5:1-2
The Genealogy Introduced In the latter part of Genesis 4, the main subject switches from Cain's descendants to the birth of Seth. Genesis 5 continues this subject with a detailed genealogy of Seth's descendants. The first two verses of Genesis 5 provide an introduction to this genealogy...

Genesis 5
The Genealogy: Adam to Noah The general concensus seems to be that genealogies are boring, tedious, and unimportant. However, the genealogy in Genesis 5 is foundational to establishing a biblical worldview. At first glance, the genealogy in Genesis 5 may appear cluttered with random numbers— but these numbers provide important insight into key features of the pre-flood world...

Genesis 5:3
Man In the Image of Man According to Genesis 1:26, God created man in His image and in His likeness. At creation, Adam and Eve were free from sin. But then Satan appeared in the garden. Eve was deceived and disobeyed God. Thus God cursed both the man and the woman and cast them out of the garden. At the fall, something changed within man...

Genesis 5:4-5
Natural Death This passage is significant for many reasons. It provides the basis for a detailed genealogy (see Genesis 5 Genealogy Timeline). It establishes the fact that Adam and Eve had children which are not specifically mentioned in Scripture— one of these children was likely Cain's wife (see Who Was Cain's Wife?). But this passage also contains the following words...

Genesis 5:21-24
Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World Other than Elijah, Enoch is the only known man to ever escape death. Because of this, people throughout history have been curious to learn more about this man. Through careful inspection of this passage and a passage in Jude, a better understanding of this man can be developed...

Genesis 5:25-27
Methuselah: The Oldest Person (969 Short Years) 969 years. Out of all the people who have walked on this earth, Methuselah has, by far, lived the longest of any recorded man in history. His 969 years is comparable with only a few men...

Genesis 5:25
State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born Lamech was born about 874 years after the creation of the world (3130 BC according to Ussher's timeline). Lamech was Adam's great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson. But amazingly, at Lamech's birth, Adam was still alive— at an amazing 874 years of age, Adam would remain alive for over another half-century...

Genesis 5:28
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth Who was alive when Noah was born? What was the state of the world? Lamech, Noah's father, was born 874 years after creation. After Lamech had lived for 182 years, he became the father of one of the most well known men in all of history. Noah was born. But the world that Noah was born into was very different from the world that his father was born into...

Genesis 5:29
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance Noah means rest. But why did Lamech give his son this name? Grasping what the world was like when Noah was born is an important step to gaining a better understanding of Genesis 5:29...

Thursday, November 25, 2010

Quote of the Day #44 - John Bunyan

This is a quote taken from the beginning of John Bunyan's famous writing, Pilgrim's Progress For those who have never read this book, this quote is a great summary of what Pilgrim's Progress is all about:
This book it chalketh out before thine eyes
The man that seeks the everlasting prize;
It shows you whence he comes, whither he goes;
What he leaves undone, also what he does;
It also shows you how he runs and runs,
Till he unto the gate of glory comes.
~John Bunyan (Pilgrim's Progress)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #45 - A. W. Pink
Quote of the Day #21 - John Bunyan
Quote of the Day #42 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #43 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

Summary of Genesis 5

The content found in Genesis 5 is tremendously important for anyone seeking to establish an accurate view of early history. The lengthy genealogy, which takes up most of the chapter, provides insight into the vastly different quality of life in the pre-flood world. Adding up the lengthy lifespans of each man in the genealogy also allows the age of the earth to be calculated.

Genesis 5 begins with a reminder of man's unique origin: Man was created in the image of God. At creation, God created them male and female. He commanded man to be fruitful and multiply (Genesis 1:28). Humanity was obedient to this command, thus the number of men in the world increased. Genesis 5 contains the genealogy of some of the most significant men who lived in the pre-flood world.

Adam was created in the image of the perfect God, but Seth was born according to the image of Adam. Seth came into the world in a different condition than his father— the same can be said of the remainder of the men in this genealogy. Adam and Eve were created in the image of God, but since the fall, man has come into being in the image of man.


Adam was the father of Seth, who was the father of Enosh, who was the father of Kenan, who was the father of Mahalalel, who was the father of Jared, who was the father of Enoch. Enoch was a prophet in the pre-flood world; he preached a message of judgment to a wicked world. Enoch was the father of Methuselah, the oldest recorded person in all of human history.

Methuselah was the father of Lamech. When Lamech was born, Adam was alive and Enoch was prophesying. But 56 years after Lamech's birth, Adam died. Although Adam's death is the third recorded death in Scripture, it appears to be the first recorded natural death. Men were beginning to die, but not from the sword. Men were dying from the natural decay of the body.

When Noah was born, Enoch had been taken by God 69 years ago. Seth had died just 14 years ago. Noah was born into a world that was growing increasingly desperate. The righteous must have longed for someone to save them. Thus Lamech named his son Noah, which means rest.

Noah would bring about a much greater rest then Lamech could have ever imagined. Through Noah, God spared the human race. Through Noah, the entire world was repopulated (through his three sons: Shem, Ham, and Japheth). But most importantly, through Noah, came the Saviour— Christ is the one who brings real and lasting rest.

Related Posts:
Summary of Genesis 6
Summary of Genesis 4
Outline of Genesis 5
Summary of Matthew 1
Scripture Index

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Quote of the Day #43 - Charles Spurgeon

A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
Only fancy what the effect would be upon our country if a proclamation were issued, that henceforth all manner of offences against the law would be immediately forgiven, and men might still continue to perpetrate them. We should hasten to emigrate from such a pandemonium. The wicked might approve of such a relaxation of the bonds of law, but it would be an awful curse to the righteous. If the judge of all the earth could possibly forgive sin while men continue to indulge in it, I do not see how the world could be inhabited; it would become a den of beasts, wild and without restraint, raging against all goodness, and even against themselves. The very pillars of society would be moved if sin could be at the same time indulged by the sinner and pardoned by the Lord.
~Charles Spurgeon (1278.88)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #44 - John Bunyan
Quote of the Day #40 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #41 - Richard Wurmbrand
Quote of the Day #42 - Paul Washer
Quote Index

Monday, November 22, 2010

Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29

Noah means rest. But why did Lamech, Noah's father, choose the name"Noah". An important step to answering this question is getting a better grasp on what the world was like at Noah's birth (for more info see State of the World: Noah's Birth).
Now he called his name Noah, saying, "This one will give us rest from our work and from the toil of our hands arising from the ground which the LORD has cursed." (Genesis 5:29)
Commentators suggest a variety of interpretations for this verse. Some say that Lamech spoke this in a spirit of prophecy. John Gill notes in his commentary that Jarchi suggests that Noah invented the plow (which helped ease man's work). But more can be learned by considering the state of the world at Noah's birth.

The world was growing more wicked. Men were dying (see Natural Death). The task which God had given to men was becoming more and more wearisome. Keeping this in mind, Lamech's choice of name for Noah is appropriate. The work and toil seemed endless. The curse was more apparent than ever. Understandably, the righteous must have longed for rest. They must have longed for someone to soothe them— to save them.
Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen. For by it the men of old gained approval. (Hebrews 11:1-2)
When Lamech said, "This one will give us rest from our work," perhaps he spoke these words in faith. Perhaps Lamech looked down at his newborn son and had faith that Noah would bring rest. What kind of rest did Lamech have in mind? Whatever his thoughts were, the rest which Noah would bring was much greater than Lamech could have ever imagined.

Through Noah, God spared the human race. Through Noah, the planet was repopulated. Through Noah, came Christ. Noah may have brought about some rest, but Christ brings about the real rest. It is only through Christ, and Him alone, that men are able to dwell in the new earth where He will wipe away every tear from their eyes; and there will no longer be any death; and there will not longer be any mourning, or crying, or pain; the first things have passed away (Revelation 21:4).

Related Posts:
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born - Genesis 5:25
Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5
Genealogy Timeline - Genesis 5
Psalm 1:2 - Delight in the LORD's Instruction

Sunday, November 21, 2010

Defending Your Faith - R. C. Sproul - Sermon Sunday

This is a 32 part series (30 minutes each) from R. C. Sproul entitled Defending Your Faith. Sproul takes a classical approach towards apologetics, which means he covers a wide range of philosophical concepts throughout the series. Click here to go to the teaching series.

Related Posts:
You Are Dearly Loved By God - Paul Washer - Sermon Sunday
Be Encouraged, Die to Self - I'll Be Honest - Sermon Sunday
A Call to Wonder - Paul Washer - Sermon Sunday
The Kingdom of Heaven is Like A Treasure - Paul Washer - Sermon Sunday
Abandoned By God - John MacArthur - Sermon Sunday

Saturday, November 20, 2010

Friday, November 19, 2010

State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28

Lamech lived one hundred and eighty-two years, and became the father of a son. (Genesis 5:28)
Who was alive when Noah was born? What was the state of the world? Lamech, Noah's father, was born 874 years after creation (see State of the World: Lamech's Birth). After Lamech had lived for 182 years, he became the father of one of the most well known men in all of history. Noah was born. But the world that Noah was born into was very different from the world that his father was born into.

Noah was born 1056 years after creation (2948 BC according to Ussher's timeline). At this point in history, Adam had been dead for 126 years. Seth had been dead for just 14 years. Men were beginning to die, but not from the human sword. Men were dying because of the curse which was proclaimed over all of humanity in the garden. Men were dying because of sin.

After thousands of years of war and disease, death seems normal. But death must have been a frightening and mysterious reality to the earliest humans. Imagine the sense of desperation that must have been present at this moment in history. Men were beginning to clearly see another terrifying consequence of the fall— natural death (and it was quickly becoming more frequent).

When Lamech was born, men were numerous and wicked. When Noah was born, men were more numerous and more wicked. And with the departure of Enoch 69 years before Noah's birth, the righteous men of the earth must have been growing more and more restless. Perhaps a slight sense of hopelessness had overcome the righteous remnant which remained on the earth. It was into this world that Noah was born— a world that was beginning to feel the pangs of death— a world that continued multiplying its wickedness...

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Related Posts:
State Of The World (2469 BC): 120 Years Before The Flood - Genesis 6:3
Noah's Name: Its Meaning and Significance - Genesis 5:29
State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born - Genesis 5:25
Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 5:21-24
Genealogy Timeline - Genesis 5

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Quote of the Day #41 - Richard Wurmbrand

A quote from Richard Wurmbrand, founder of Voice of the Martyrs:
If you are not willing to die for what is in the Bible, you should not give money for Bibles. Because if you give, we will smuggle more Bibles. And if we smuggle more Bibles, there will be more martyrs.
~Richard Wurmbrand

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #42 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #38 - C. S. Lewis
Quote of the Day #39 - Leonard Ravenhill
Quote of the Day #40 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

State of the World (3130 BC): Noah's Father (Lamech) Is Born - Genesis 5:25

Methuselah lived one hundred and eighty-seven years, and became the father of Lamech. (Genesis 5:25)
Lamech was born about 874 years after the creation of the world (3130 BC according to James Ussher's timeline). Lamech was Adam's great-great-great-great-great-great-grandson. But amazingly, at Lamech's birth, Adam was still alive— at an amazing 874 years of age, Adam would remain alive for over another half-century.

Although the number of humans on the planet would have quickly grown over the first 874 years of history, it seems reasonable that Lamech likely met Adam at some point in his life. It's amazing that hundreds and hundreds of years after the fall, Lamech was still likely able to hear a first-hand account of the fall!

Prior to the birth of Lamech, Scripture records of two men who were murdered (Cain killed Abel and the polygamous Lamech also murdered a man). While it seems (very) likely that other men were murdered in the first 874 years of the world, the reality of natural death (see Natural Death) was probably not yet fully realized.

When Lamech was born, all of the men in his lineage were still alive (his father was still alive, his grandfather was still alive, his great grandfather was still alive, etc). The first natural death recorded of in Scripture did not occur until 56 years after Lamech's birth.

Even more significantly, when Lamech was born, Enoch (see Enoch: A Prophet) was likely in the middle of his earthly ministry. Although the world was filled with wickedness, some hope could be found. It was into this world that Lamech was born— a world that had heard the voice of a prophet— a world that had some hope. A world that was vaguely familiar with death, but blind to the wickedness of sin.

Next >>

Related Posts:
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5
Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 5:21-24
Methuselah: The Oldest Person (969 Short Years) - Genesis 5:25-27
Genealogy Timeline - Genesis 5

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Quote of the Day #40 - Charles Spurgeon

A quote from Charles Spurgeon regarding angels:
How angels thus keep us we cannot tell. Whether they repel demons, counteract spiritual plots, or even ward off the subtler physical forces of disease, we do not know. Perhaps we shall one day stand amazed at the multiplied services which the unseen bands have rendered to us.
~Charles Spurgeon (TD91:11)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #41 - Richard Wurmbrand
Quote of the Day #37 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #38 - C. S. Lewis
Quote of the Day #39 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Monday, November 15, 2010

Methuselah: The Oldest Person (969 Short Years) - Genesis 5:25-27

Methuselah lived one hundred and eighty-seven years, and became the father of Lamech. Then Methuselah lived seven hundred and eighty-two years after he became the father of Lamech, and he had other sons and daughters. So all the days of Methuselah were nine hundred and sixty-nine years, and he died. (Genesis 5:25-27)
969 years. Out of all the people who have walked on this earth, Methuselah has, by far, lived the longest of any recorded man in history. His 969 years is comparable with only a few men. Jared, mentioned in Genesis 5:20, lived 962 years. And Adam, the first man, lived for 930 years (see Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5).

969 years. It's hard to grasp. In an age when a person is fortunate (or unfortunate, depending on how you look at it) to live 100 years, it's strange to realize that 5 millennia ago, a person 100 years old would be considered youth.

969 years. They were cut short by a catastrophe— a massive flood sent by God which covered the whole planet. Adding up the years in the genealogy in Genesis 5 reveals an interesting piece of information: Methuselah died in the same year that God sent the flood! It is unknown whether Methuselah died before the flood or in the flood. However, since Methuselah's name means, "man of a dart," some additional insight can be gathered. Some commentators suggest that this "dart" refers to the flood— that Methuselah's name was a prophesy of the judgment to come.

969 years. It may be over 10 times the lifespan in this current period of history. It may seem like an eternity, but it's not. Man is like a mere breath; His days are like a passing shadow. (Psalm 144:4) Relative to 100 years, 969 years is a long time, but relative to eternity, it's virtually nothing. Man is nothing but a speck on the timeline of eternity:



Related Posts:
State of the World (2948 BC): Noah's Birth - Genesis 5:28
Genealogy Timeline - Genesis 5
The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2
The Genealogy: Adam to Noah - Genesis 5
Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 5:21-24

Friday, November 12, 2010

Genealogy Timeline - Genesis 5

Below is a simple graphical representation of the genealogy in Genesis 5. The length of each bar is proportional to the age of each person. To view the full sized graphic click here.




The posts below describe the state of the world based on the genealogy in Genesis 5:

To read a short summary of Genesis 5 click here.

Other Related Posts:
The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2
The Genealogy: Adam to Noah - Genesis 5
Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 5:21-24
Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5
Man In the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Quote of the Day #38 - C. S. Lewis


A quote from C. S. Lewis:
The moment you say that one set of moral ideas can be better than another, you are, in fact, measuring them both by a standard, saying that one of them conforms to that standard more nearly than the other. But the standard that measures two things is something different from either. You are, in fact, comparing them both with some Real Morality, admitting that there is such a thing as a real Right, independent of what people think, and that some people's ideas get nearer to that real Right than others. Or put it this way. If your moral ideas can be truer, and those of the Nazis less true, there must be something — some Real Morality — for them to be true about.
~C.S. Lewis (Mere Christianity, Book 1, Chapter 2)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #39 - Leonard Ravenhill
Quote of the Day #35 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #36 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #37 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote Index

Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 5:21-24

Enoch lived sixty-five years, and became the father of Methuselah. Then Enoch walked with God three hundred years after he became the father of Methuselah, and he had other sons and daughters. So all the days of Enoch were three hundred and sixty-five years. Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him. (Genesis 5:21-24)
Other than Elijah, Enoch is the only known man to ever escape death. Because of this, people throughout history have been curious to learn more about this man. Through careful inspection of this passage and a passage in Jude, a better understanding of this man can be developed.

Enoch was a prophet; he was a man who proclaimed God's truth. After the flood, God sent many more prophets to proclaim truth to men. Samuel and Isaiah. Jeremiah and Ezekiel... Think of all the prophets in Scripture who walked with God for well under 100 years. Think of all their labor and pain. Think of how much they must have longed to simply depart and be with God. And now think of the fact that Enoch walked with God for 300 years (at least)! His eyes must have been firmly fixed on eternity.

In the New Testament, the book of Jude provides insight into Enoch's message:
It was also about these men that Enoch, in the seventh generation from Adam, prophesied, saying, "Behold, the Lord came with many thousands of His holy ones, to execute judgment upon all, and to convict all the ungodly of all their ungodly deeds which they have done in an ungodly way, and of all the harsh things which ungodly sinners have spoken against Him." (Jude 14-15)
Enoch could be considered the second mentioned prophet in Scripture (Jesus said Abel was the first — Luke 11:50-51). Like other prophets, Enoch proclaimed a message of judgment to a wicked world. Although men lived longer in the pre-flood world, it did not make them any less wicked. On the contrary, it gave men the opportunity to rebel longer and heap more judgement upon themselves.

As in all generations, God had a righteous remnant. In Elijah's time, Elijah wasn't the only righteous man, but God had kept 7000 others (Romans 11:4). And so it seems unlikely that Enoch was the only righteous man in his time. Regardless, he certainly seems to be one of the most significant figures of early human history— a man who preached the justice of God in a chaotic world.

Related Posts:
Methuselah: The Oldest Person (969 Short Years) - Genesis 5:25-27
The Genealogy: Adam to Noah - Genesis 5
The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2
Summary of Genesis 4
How Bad Is Sin? (Part 1)

Tuesday, November 09, 2010

Quote of the Day #37 - Charles Spurgeon

A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
I confess that when I have to argue about the truth of divine things it is a dreary task to me. I am so sure of these things myself, by living and actual test, that I wonder other people are not sure too; and while they are wanting me to argue about this point or that it seems to me like asking a man to prove that there is a sun in yonder sky. I bask in his beams, I swoon under his heat, I see by his light; and yet they ask me to prove his existence! Are the men mad? What do they want me to prove? That God hears prayer? I pray and receive answers every day. That God pardons sin? I was in my own esteem the blackest of sinners, and sunk in the depths of despair, yet I believed, and by that faith I leaped into a fulness of light and liberty at once. Why do they not try it themselves?
~Charles Spurgeon (1428.454)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #38 - C. S. Lewis
Quote of the Day #34 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #35 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #36 - John Owen
Quote Index

Monday, November 08, 2010

The Genealogy: Adam to Noah - Genesis 5

The general concensus seems to be that genealogies are boring, tedious, and unimportant. However, the genealogy in Genesis 5 is foundational to establishing a biblical worldview. At first glance, the genealogy in Genesis 5 may appear cluttered with random numbers— but these numbers provide important insight into key features of the pre-flood world.

First, Genesis 5 provides insight into the health of men in the pre-flood world. Excluding Enoch, the shortest lifespan mentioned in Genesis 5 is 777 years! Whatever the state of the world was before the flood, it can be safely concluded that something was very different. Some would argue that there was a difference in climate. Others would argue that humanity had not yet gained the many mutations present in humanity today.

Even more significant than quality of life, Genesis 5 contains a clear connection point between Adam and Noah. By adding the time periods together, it can be determined that Noah was born 1056 years after the creation of the world (and from this it can be calculated from later portions of Scripture that the flood occurred 1656 years after creation, when Noah was 600 years old — Genesis 7:6).

For those who believe that evolution and the Bible are compatible, the genealogy in Genesis 5 shows that such a belief is unreasonable. There are no gaps in the Genesis 5 genealogy. The flood occurred about 1656 years after the creation of the world. And from the flood, the elapsed time from Noah to Abraham can be known through Genesis 11:10-32. Clearly, no room is present in Genesis for millions and billions of years.

Related Posts:
Enoch: A Prophet in the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 5:21-24
The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2
Age of the Earth - The Christian Worldview
Man In the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3
Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5

Saturday, November 06, 2010

Quote of the Day #36 - John Owen

A quote from John Owen:
When a man has confirmed his imagination to such an apprehension of grace and mercy as to be able, without bitterness, to swallow and digest daily sins, that man is at the very brink of turning the grace of God into lasciviousness and being hardened by the deceitfulness of sin.
~John Owen (Of The Mortification Of Sin In Believers, Part 1, Chapter 2)

John Owen was a puritan born in the early 1600s. This quote was taken from the book Overcoming Sin and Temptation, Three Classic Works By John Owen, published by Crossway in 2006.

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #37 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #16 - John Owen
Quote of the Day #34 - Charles Spurgeon
Quote of the Day #35 - Paul Washer
Quote Index

Friday, November 05, 2010

Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5

Then the days of Adam after he became the father of Seth were eight hundred years, and he had other sons and daughters. So all the days that Adam lived were nine hundred and thirty years, and he died. (Genesis 5:4-5)
This passage is significant for many reasons. It provides the basis for a detailed genealogy (see Genesis 5 Genealogy Timeline). It establishes the fact that Adam and Eve had children which are not specifically mentioned in Scripture— one of these children was likely Cain's wife (see Who Was Cain's Wife?). But this passage also contains the following words:
and he died.
These words can be read without much thought. Death is so prevalent in human society that it is easy to accept it as a fact of life. But death isn't just a fact of life... it's a tragedy.

God told Adam not to eat from the tree in the garden. He said, in the day that you eat from it you will surely die. (Genesis 2:17) Adam disobeyed God, ate from the tree, and died spiritually— he was severed from God. But God was merciful at the fall. He gave man a second chance. Physical death was delayed.

For Adam, death was delayed hundreds of years. But nonetheless, death still came. Although Adam's death is the third recorded death in Scripture, it appears to have been the first natural death. Cain killed Abel. Lamech also killed a man. But Adam appears to have been the first man to die due to the natural decay of the body.

This passage should remind every person of the following reality: You will die. You are not eternal and should not live as if you are. Whether you are slain like Abel or die from decay... death will come. Jesus said in Matthew 6:27, And who of you by being worried can add a single hour to his life? Don't worry about death— instead, concern yourself with living for that which is eternal.

Related Posts:
The Genealogy: Adam to Noah - Genesis 5
Man In the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3
The Fall: Merciful Curses - The Christian Worldview
The Fall: No Repentance - The Christian Worldview
Summary of Genesis 4

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Man In the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3

According to Genesis 1:26, God created man in His image and in His likeness. At creation, Adam and Eve were free from sin. But then Satan appeared in the garden. Eve was deceived and disobeyed God. Thus God cursed both the man and the woman and cast them out of the garden.

Men did not look at the chaos caused by the first act of disobedience and cease from sin. Instead, men grew terribly wicked. Cain killed his own brother. Immorality was embraced and men pursued temporal inventions over their Creator.

At the fall, something changed within man. The evidence of this is present throughout Genesis 4, but in Genesis 5:3, it is proved:
When Adam had lived one hundred and thirty years, he became the father of a son in his own likeness, according to his image, and named him Seth. (Genesis 5:3)
What had changed within man? Adam and Eve were created in the image of the perfect God, but Seth was made in the image and likeness of fallen Adam.

From this, it is plainly evident that Adam came into existence in a different condition then those men born after the fall. Adam was created directly in the image of the perfect God, but every man since the fall has been conceived in the image of sinful man.

Related Posts:
Natural Death - Genesis 5:4-5
The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2
The Fall: Merciful Curses - The Christian Worldview
Why Is Sin Unavoidable? (Part 1) - The Christian Worldview
Summary of Genesis 4

Tuesday, November 02, 2010

Quote of the Day #34 - Charles Spurgeon

A quote from Charles Spurgeon:
No wonder that sinners are given to slumber when saints sleep as they do. No wonder that the unconverted think hell a fiction when we live as if it were so. No wonder that they imagine heaven to be a romance, when we act as if it were so little a reality.
~Charles Spurgeon (1427.444)

Related Posts:
Quote of the Day #35 - Paul Washer
Quote of the Day #31 - Leonard Ravenhill
Quote of the Day #32 - George Whitefield
Quote of the Day #33 - John MacArthur
Quote Index

Monday, November 01, 2010

The Genealogy Introduced - Genesis 5:1-2

Genesis 5 marks a transition. While Genesis 4 primarily discusses Cain's descendants, Genesis 5 describes Seth's descendants. The first two verses of Genesis 5 provide an introduction to Seth's genealogy, beginning with his father Adam:
This is the book of the generations of Adam. (Genesis 5:1)
All people, regardless of their gender or nationality, can find their earliest descendants in this genealogy. Adam was a real and historical figure, the first father of every person— for God made from one man every nation of mankind to live on all the face of the earth (Acts 17:26).

The next part of Genesis 5:1 is similar to what God said in Genesis 1:26, "Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness" (Genesis 1:26):
In the day when God created man, He made him in the likeness of God. (Genesis 5:1)
First, notice the word "day". God created man on the sixth day of creation. It was no evolutionary process. No purely natural process can form an eternal being made in the image of God. Men are not animals. There is more to man than a physical body. Men are unique spiritual beings who have the ability to reason and think. They are able to express emotion and appreciate beauty.
He created them male and female, and He blessed them and named them Man in the day when they were created. (Genesis 5:2)
Like the previous statement, this verse also reminds the reader of man's uniqueness. After God blessed man at creation, He commanded men, "Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth... (Genesis 1:28). Men were obedient to this command and thus a genealogy was needed in order to record the lineage of man. This genealogy takes up the rest of Genesis 5 and reveals incredibly important information regarding both the age of the earth and the longevity of our earliest ancestors.

Related Posts:
Man in the Image of Man - Genesis 5:3
The Birth of Seth - Genesis 4:25
Righteous Men of the Pre-Flood World - Genesis 4:26
Creation of Man - The Christian Worldview
Summary of Genesis 4